Growth

We are the Seeds turns 2

"The feeling of community that's coming through this year is blowing my mind," We are the Seeds co-founder Tailinh Agoyo says. "If this is any indication of how these two days will be, it gives me chills."

Indeed, it's almost hard to believe the fledgling Indigenous arts market is only entering its second year. In a way, it feels like it's always been a part of the local cultural landscape—or, at least, like the contemporary, forward-thinking market many have desired for a long time.

"I think it just kind of happens," Agoyo continues. "It was us welcoming all kinds of art—there was no limitation as long as the art was of good quality, and it was pretty close that everyone who applied got in."

Thus, on Thursday and Friday in the Railyard, Seeds becomes a sprawling affair with over 70 artists plus numerous music, fashion and dance performances from area Natives, a silent auction, special food offerings from the likes of Jambo Café, youth workshops and more.

"I think we have a really good mix this year," Agoyo says, though she seems particularly excited for the 6 pm social dances on Thursday Aug. 16. "I remember, growing up in Rhode Island and Brooklyn, we'd go to the American Indian Community House, and every month they'd have these dances where you could meet up with other Natives in New York; urban Indians and city Indians—it can sometimes be hard to find each other, and I have this memory of them being so fun—or just being there to enjoy the music and dance with friends."

Such feelings of community and fun are at the core of Seeds' mission, one that Agoyo has worked for years to get off the ground as a former organizer for both SWAIA and now-defunct Indigenous Fine Art Market.

"Obviously it's really important for the artists to make money at the show, but for me, this is a celebration of us and everybody's invited," she says. "If we can bring the joy and the beautiful art and we are honest and authentic with ourselves, the people will come."

Let's prove her right. (Alex De Vore)

We are the Seeds 2018: 
10 am-6 pm Thursday and Friday Aug, 16 and  17. Free.
Santa Fe Railyard,
Market and Alcaldesa Streets,
982-3373;
wearetheseeds.org.

Moving Pictures

Courtesy Native Cinema Showcase

With Indigenous art firmly in everyone's minds this time of year, Washington, DC's National Museum of the American Indian's Native Cinema Showcase becomes another don't-miss event in a sea of exciting others. The 18th annual iteration at the New Mexico History Museum features short and full-length films created by some of today's most talented Native voices and strikes that challenging tone between entertaining and educational. Seating is totally free but majorly limited—but luckily the event runs all week. (ADV)

Native Cinema Showcase: 
1 pm Wednesday-Sunday August 15-19. Free. New Mexico History Museum, 113 Lincoln Ave., 476-5100; tinyurl.com/nativecinema18.

Get on the Mic

Public Domain

It seems like big things are on the horizon for Zephyr Community Art Studio, one of SFR's favorite DIY arts and music spaces located on the Southside of Santa Fe. Case in point: the upcoming Queer and Trans* Open Mic. There's a radical streak to the night's lineup and performers are encouraged to push the envelope, as it were, in exploring the themes and elements of their lives—both good, bad and in-between. Note that while the gathering is all-ages, adult themes might be on display. Still, it's never too early to teach the youths acceptance and understanding, right? Right. (ADV)

Queer and Trans* Open Mic: 
7-9:30 pm Friday Aug. 17. $7-$12.
Zephyr Community Art Studio,
1520 Center Drive, Ste. 2.

Swangin’ Room

Public Domain

When I asked about the two-decade-old Monday night swing dance tradition in Santa Fe, I tell organizer Meg Meltz that I have 19 left feet and no coordination among them. She replies, glee in her voice: "I started out like that. I never danced a step till I was 40. … Now I'm almost 70, and I've ben dancing this whole time. And I'm a decent dancer now!" If you know what you're doing, some of these folks are your peers; if you don't, go to a lesson to meet other beginners and ease your way in. There's no age range or experience required, and Monday's event features a special treat from the impossibly jaunty Americana swing tunes of Big Cedar Fever. "You should come and try it out!" Meltz urges. "Trust the process a little bit." (Charlotte Jusinski)

Monday Night Swing with Big Cedar Fever: 
Lesson: 7 pm; dance: 8 pm Monday Aug. 20. $10.
Odd Fellows Hall,
1125 Cerrillos Road,
470-7077