--2 Albuquerque To Afghanistan: Six Months From Enlistment To Death
       
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Albuquerque To Afghanistan: Six Months From Enlistment To Death

February 12, 2010, 12:00 am
By Corey Pein

SANTA FE – Governor Bill Richardson has lowered flags in honor of United States Army PFC. Zachary G. Lovejoy, 20, who was killed in the line of duty in Afghanistan on February 2, 2010.

Pfc. Zachary Lovejoy, a resident of Albuquerque, was active in ROTC in high school and was a 2008 graduate of La Cueva High School. He enlisted in the Army in the Summer of 2008 and was deployed to Afghanistan in August of 2009.

These announcements have felt routine for some time. They're even easier to ignore when the authorities make no photo available of the deceased.

However, Lovejoy still has a public MySpace page. No one has posted there lately.

And here are a series of photos from Zabul province, where he died.

Richardson's announcement:
Governor Bill Richardson Lowers Flags in Honor of Army PFC. Zachary G. Lovejoy

SANTA FE – Governor Bill Richardson has lowered flags in honor of United States Army PFC. Zachary G. Lovejoy, 20, who was killed in the line of duty in Afghanistan on February 2, 2010. .

Pfc. Zachary Lovejoy, a resident of Albuquerque, was active in ROTC in high school and was a 2008 graduate of La Cueva High School. He enlisted in the Army in the Summer of 2008 and was deployed to Afghanistan in August of 2009.

Pfc. Lovejoy is survived by his parents, Terry and Mike Lovejoy from Albuquerque; his sister Ashley also of Albuquerque; his fiancé, Kaitlin Varner of Jonesville, SC; and his grandparents, Rose and Lowell Lovejoy of Staunton, IL.

Pfc. Lovejoy was assigned to the 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division at Fort Bragg in North Carolina.

In honor of Army PFC Zachary G. Lovejoy, Governor Richardson signed an Executive Order directing flags be flown at half-staff from Tuesday, February 16, 2010 through sundown on Wednesday, February 17, 2010.

Full text of the Executive Order follows:

EXECUTIVE ORDER 2010-004

FLAGS FLOWN AT HALF STAFF IN HONOR AND MOURNING
OF UNITED STATES ARMY PRIVATE FIRST CLASS ZACHARY G. LOVEJOY

WHEREAS, United States Army Pfc. Zachary G. Lovejoy, age 20, died on Tuesday, February 2, 2010, while serving in Zabul Province, Afghanistan, in support of Operation Enduring Freedom;

WHEREAS, Pfc. Lovejoy, was born on August 20, 1989 in Lafayette, Indiana and moved to Albuquerque in 1992. He was a 2008 graduate of La Cueva High School, where he was a member of the ROTC. While at La Cueva, he played football, ran track and was also a wrestler;

WHEREAS, Pfc. Lovejoy joined the Army in August of 2008 and was sent to Fort Benning, Georgia on August 19, 2008, completed Airborne training in February, 2009 and was deployed to Afghanistan on August 28, 2009. He was assigned to C Company, 1st Battalion, 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82nd Airborne Division, Fort Bragg, North Carolina;

WHEREAS, Pfc. Lovejoy is survived by his parents Mike and Terry Lovejoy, his sister Ashley and his fiancé Kaitlin Varner; and

WHEREAS, Pfc. Lovejoy's patriotism, bravery, and dedication to the Nation will always be remembered.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Bill Richardson, Governor of the State of New Mexico, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the Laws of the State of New Mexico, do hereby order that all flags be flown at half-staff from Tuesday, February 16, 2010, until sundown on Wednesday, February 17, 2010, in honor and mourning of United States Army Private First Class Zachary G. Lovejoy. The thoughts and prayers of the people of New Mexico go out to his family as well as a heartfelt appreciation for his courageous service.

 

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