--2 Police: Wrong-way driver's job relevant
       
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Police: Wrong-way driver's job relevant

Adult escort work could be tied to alcohol consumption

January 7, 2011, 1:00 am
By Wren Abbot

Santa Fe Police Chief Aric Wheeler tells SFR that his agency considers new information regarding deceased wrong-way driver Kylene Holmes' profession relevant to its investigation of the Dec. 14, 2010 crash. 

As SFR previously reported, Holmes, 27, advertised her services as an adult escort on several Web sites, and included a price list for half-hour, hour-long and overnight visits.

"The way I look at it is, if you're a bus driver, how in-depth do we get into what your profession is to the relevancy [of the case]?" Wheeler asks. "If it's a job that may lead you to an alcohol establishment or there may be alcohol involved in the scope of that job, then yes, it's relevant to us."

Wheeler says the question of whether Holmes had been at an escort engagement before drinking at the Cowgirl Bar and Grill that night is one of many that still remain unanswered. He said rumors have been circulating that Holmes and her passenger, Jennifer Belvin, 38, made appearances at nearly every downtown bar, but none have been corroborated. He said Belvin corroborated reports that they have been drinking at the Cowgirl, but that disclosure won't prevent police from investigating other alcohol establishments as well.

"Just because someone tells us one location doesn't mean that we limit our scope," Wheeler says.

It's also still an open question whether the Cowgirl or any of its servers will face consequences for serving the women. Credit card receipts show Holmes and Belvin each paid for one drink, and although they could have consumed more there that they bought with cash or didn't pay for themselves, it will be difficult to prove the Cowgirl over-served the women, Wheeler tells SFR.

"It's a whole other factor as to what other alcohol was purchased and by who," Wheeler says. "That factors in as well as to whether they were serving impaired individuals. We can't really say that based on [the credit card purchase]. The only credit card receipts show a minimal number of drinks purchased by the two females, then obviously what's the responsibility upon the servers to ensure who else is providing drinks for these females?"

The Cowgirl's cooperation with the investigation and the commendable actions of one employee who tried to stop the women from driving "is looked upon favorably by law enforcement" but won't influence the findings of the investigation, Wheeler says. No other alcohol establishments have come forward and admitted serving the women.

The over-serving aspect of the case has been turned over to the Department of Public Safety Special Investigations Division, who is awaiting toxicology results at this time, Wheeler says. Lt. Chris Ortiz of SID hadn't returned SFR's call before press time.

Amy Boule, director of operations at the state Office of the Medical Investigator, says toxicology test results might not be available until the end of January or later.

Unidentified prescription pills, suspected marijuana and an open bottle of Grey Goose were found in Holmes' car, according to a search warrant.

 

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