--2 Eyedropper
         
Feb. 28, 2015

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Protesting the PARCC

Suspended teens want meeting with state officals about the standardized test

Local News A dozen Santa Fe High School students stood in front of the state Public Education Department today, calling for a meeting with Public Education Department Secretary Hanna Skandera over testing that they say goes too far. ... More

Feb. 25, 2015 by Joey Peters

 

 

Eyedropper

Pick of the patch

February 23, 2009, 12:00 am
By Rani Molla


Show us what has left the back of your eyelids burning. Send pictures of visual trespass and peculiarities to copyeditor [at] sfreporter.com, subject “eyedropper.”

This video owes its genesis to Dave Maass' graffiti research and his unknowing investigation into a lost era of Santa Fe's history.



Here we find a prime example of visual story telling wherein, with pictures and few words, we are forced to make our own narrative leaps. First we are introduced to the peccant Pigs who have wreaked havoc on what we will soon learn/assume is a quiet, God-fearing village. Who knows how long their vileness has tormented the villagers and kept them asunder from their happiness. What shall they do!?

Enter the modernist hero, Mr. Skellington, the rightful king of the pumpkin patch and, by extension, the village's only hope. Fear not his homely teeth and triangular eyes, he has a heart of gold, as signified by the glowing aura radiating from his person. It is he who will bring the villagers, who we must assume rely on the kindly pumpkin patch for their livelihood, back to their former greatness after years of pig tyranny.

After a long and drawn out battle—ellipsed in the visual portrayal for the sake of graphic economy, not lack of skill—Mr. Skellington, in a divine battle of good versus evil, arrives victorious. He frees the people of the pumpkin village and they, left to their own righteousness, are restored to happiness and prosperity. The villagers, thankful, rejoice in unison, "Hail, The Pumpkin King." Cute. The end.

 

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