June 28, 2016

3 Questions

with Nina Roosevelt Gibson

3 Questions Nina Roosevelt Gibson is the granddaughter of Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt, not to mention a distant relative of Teddy. Beneath a humble demeanor, Gibson embodies the Roosevelt spirit of compassion.

June 22, 2016 by Andrew Koss

3 Questions

with Jon Moritsugu

3 Questions Veteran filmmaker Jon Moritsugu is the visionary behind such underground cult hits as Mod Fuck Explosion and Pig Death Machine. He’s even Grammy-nominated for the “No Future Shock” music video he directed for TV on the Radio.

June 15, 2016 by Alex De Vore

3 Questions

with Damon Griffith

3 Questions Damon Griffith may be known to some as a member of freak-folk act, Cloacas, and to others as so-called “mouth DJ,” Heavy Breather. But he’s also the only authentic puppet engineer in town, and that’s as cool as it gets. For his most recent pr

June 08, 2016 by Alex De Vore

3 Questions

with Lars Krutak

3 Questions Tattoos are beautiful, and they’re also more commonplace today than ever before. With that in mind, we’d also point out that where there is a thing lots of people are doing, there’s a human studying that thing.

June 01, 2016 by Alex De Vore

3 Questions

with James Karen

3 Questions Veteran actor James Karen has been a part of film, television and theater history since the 1920s, and his body of work is massive.

May 25, 2016 by Alex De Vore

3 Questions

with Rose B Simpson

3 Questions Local artist Rose B Simpson is a graduate of RISD as well as the now defunct automotive science program at Northern New Mexico College in Española.

May 18, 2016 by Alex De Vore

3 Questions

with Sean Chen

3 Questions After winning an astonishing number of awards both before and after college at Juilliard, classical pianist Sean Chen is doing what he loves best: travelling the country to play at a wide range of venues.

May 11, 2016 by Cybele Mayes-Osterman

3 Questions

with David Tardy

3 Questions David Tardy, native New Yorker, composer and broadcaster, is the center of Warehouse 21’s teen tornado.

May 04, 2016 by Cybele Mayes-Osterman

3 Questions

with Sol Bentley

3 Questions Y’all know Sol Bentley as DJ Dynamite Sol: owner of Skylight, spinner of jams and, in this instance, lover of man/womankind.

April 27, 2016 by Alex De Vore

3 Questions

with Linda Schafer

3 Questions What better way to spend the day after Earth Day than learning about and loving on bees in the Santa Fe Railyard Park? Linda Schafer, director of the Railyard Stewards, says she’s fallen in love with native bees lately, and she wants you to, too.

April 20, 2016 by Julie Ann Grimm

Artivism

Curator Niomi Fawn builds a platform for Santa Fe artists who are fighting to be heard

Art Features “You are what you say you are. I’m a curator,” Niomi Fawn tells SFR. “To curate is more than just putting art on walls. It’s world bridging.”

June 22, 2016 by Jordan Eddy

Brick-and-Mortar

Bobby Beals and A Nigh Herndon rethink the structure of Canyon Road

Art Features Artist A Nigh Herndon is acutely aware that his work clashes with the rest of Canyon Road.

June 15, 2016 by Jordan Eddy

Remixed

Craft and design crash the fine art party at Form & Concept

Art Features It’s Sunday evening of Form & Concept’s opening weekend, and founder Sandy Zane sits at the front desk in the shade of several massive bouquets. She’s counting out the cash drawer in preparation for closing time. In its first three days, the sp

June 08, 2016 by Jordan Eddy

Limiting Mobility

A proposed expansion of the vehicle vendors ordinance to Canyon Road would essentially cut Axle Contemporary’s mobile gallery from the scene

Art Features For most people who enter Axle Contemporary, the mobile art gallery housed within a retired delivery truck, the experience is one of serendipity.

June 01, 2016 by Elizabeth Miller

Sailing toward Open Waters

Strangers Collective latest exhibit, Narrows, continues their path of bringing big returns to emerging artists

Art Features If you’re trying to break into a scene as well established as Santa Fe’s art world, sometimes it helps to take a few friends along—or a few strangers.

May 18, 2016 by Elizabeth Miller

Q & A with Joe Hill

Art Features Joe Hill, 44, is touring to promote his fourth book, The Fireman. His scheduled appearance in Santa Fe on Monday, May 23, promises a trivia game with George RR Martin.

May 18, 2016 by Julie Ann Grimm

I’ll See You in My Dreams

Jared Weiss’ artwork tours through the half-forgotten and nearly suppressed

Art Features Like those candy-colored memories from childhood, Jared Weiss’ paintings can’t really be trusted to tell you the whole story, or to relay the details that could cue an accurate interpretation of what happened.

May 11, 2016 by Elizabeth Miller

Seeds of Change

Art exhibit at the Roundhouse invites a conversation about our use, and abuse, of the land

Art Features For many years, Bobbe Besold has photographed the hands of farmers, often those she met at the Santa Fe Farmers Market, in or near their stands of produce and between customers, their fingers draped over carrots or cupping pints of berries.

May 04, 2016 by Elizabeth Miller

Wild at Heart

Glass artists take every shape

Art Features Standing in front of the giant gas-powered furnaces, the heat is oppressive; it’s just shy of pain. Large metal rods lay in wait, partially inside the cooking monstrosities, flames licking out from the front.

April 27, 2016 by Ben Kendall

Rising Sun

Local Japanese-Americans share their culture

Art Features Japan is already here. We come into contact with Japan every day in some way. Indeed, the cultural caché of that small island nation has influenced the entire world.

April 13, 2016 by Ben Kendall

Violet Crown Cinema Ready for its Close-Up

Santa Fe spin-off of the Austin-based cinema set for April 30 opening

Arts After much hullabaloo, the 11-screen Violet Crown Theaters are set to open the doors of the brand-new Railyard space on April 30. This after a private VIP reception scheduled for later this week.

March 30, 2015 by Enrique Limón

Ugly Sweaters & Season’s Greetings!

These are a few of our favorite knits

Arts Last Friday, SFR staffers donned their holiday worst, gorged on gingerbread everything and chugged spiked punch as if the world was about to end.

Dec. 17, 2014 by SFR

Skull Candy

Where to celebrate Día de los Muertos in style

Arts Día de Los Muertos is a vibrant celebration that brings people together every year to memorialize the lives of those who have passed. This weekend, two of the city’s biggest cultural centers offer activities, music and food to celebrate the holiday.

Oct. 31, 2014 by Luke Henley

Where the Action's At

Where the Action's At: Today's the last day to catch the SFFF

Arts World renowned writer of the Game of Thrones series and Jean Cocteau Cinema owner, George RR Martin, leans against one of the rows of seats in his theater as a mob of actors, producers, critics...

May 04, 2014 by JP Stupfel

Flick Fest Underway

Santa Fe Film Festival continues through Sunday

Arts The Santa Fe Film Festival is set to run through Sunday with movies showing at the Jean Cocteau and CCA theaters.

May 02, 2014 by JP Stupfel

Second to None

SFAI program enlightens, two-and-a-half minutes at a time

Arts The Santa Fe Art Institute gathers a small fraction of artists-in-residence every quarter, and asks them to speak about their work.

March 25, 2014 by Zoe Haskell

Summer’s Ending

With another lurking in the wings

Arts When Charles MacKay, general director of the Santa Fe Opera, stepped into the spotlight Aug. 19 just before the final La donna del lago of the season, the audience gasped a collective uh-oh. Who’d cancelled? Anxiety filled the house...

Aug. 27, 2013 by John Stege

Robert Who?

Plus that avid uxoricide Gesualdo’s maddening madrigals

Arts “Well. I think they must have just about run out of Schumann.” And so went an overheard comment at the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival’s Aug. 15 evening concert. The occasion? Number three of four concerts billed as “Years of Wonder,” each featuring Gesualdo madrigals, Mozart piano trios and, need you ask, chamber works by Robert Schumann.

Aug. 20, 2013 by John Stege

Oscar’s Fatal Attraction

A messy night at the Opera

Arts It was, for sure, Oscar Night out at the Santa Fe Opera last Saturday, e.g., the world premiere of Theodore Morrison’s anticipated work depicting Oscar Wilde’s last years..

July 30, 2013 by John Stege

Violetta Revisited

And a sweet start for ChamberFest ‘13

Arts Finally I get it. Five years ago I denounced Laurent Pelly’s staging of Verdi’s La traviata for the Santa Fe Opera as “spectacularly inept.”

July 23, 2013 by John Stege

XX Marks the Spot

Fair sex strikes back in new exhibit

Arts Valve Santa Fe-based artist Ligia Bouton's Understudy for Animal Farm parts from George Orwell’s dystopian novella and points the mirror back at the viewer.

Sept. 09, 2015 by Enrique Limón

Cue the Credits

It’s curtains for Casablanca Video

Arts Valve “Sold!” Casablanca Video owner Bruce Smith says in his best auctioneer voice as he dispatches a customer, who leaves armed with a bagful of DVDs.

Sept. 02, 2015 by Enrique Limón

Frank Buffalo Hyde

Arts Valve Onondaga/Nez Perce artist Frank Buffalo Hyde (b. 1974) sees Hollywood and the fashion industry’s attempts at appropriation and raises them.

Aug. 19, 2015 by Enrique Limón

Meryl McMaster

Arts Valve A Plains Cree member of the Siksika Nation who is also of European descent, the 27-year-old explored the topic of identity early on, along with perception, memory and myth.

Aug. 19, 2015 by Enrique Limón

Santiago X

Arts Valve A couple of years back, I became familiar with the art of Santiago X, which can best be described as equal parts transgressive and tongue-in-cheek.

Aug. 19, 2015 by Enrique Limón

Teri Greeves

Arts Valve Stackable plastic drawers filled with her “stash”—beads in every hue known to man—dominate the studio of Teri Greeves (b. 1970).

Aug. 19, 2015 by Enrique Limón

Jaque Fragua

Arts Valve “Jaque is passionate and can express his aims with his mural far better than I could,” Shepard Fairey says of one of Jaque Fragua’s monumental pieces.

Aug. 19, 2015 by Enrique Limón

Shan Goshorn

Arts Valve “Meticulous” doesn’t even begin to describe the work of Shan Goshorn (b. 1957). Rooted in advocacy, education and activism, the Eastern Band of Cherokee artist’s double-woven works tell a complex story of oppression, redemption and survival.

Aug. 19, 2015 by Enrique Limón

Steven Paul Judd

Arts Valve Specializing in pieces “for Indians to have, and that gets white people to think,” Kiowa/Choctaw artist Steven Paul Judd draws from the lack of mainstream Native American culture during his childhood and rewrites history.

Aug. 19, 2015 by Enrique Limón

Domina Effect

Enter the uniquely titillating world of Zircus Erotique

Arts Valve Even away from the lights of the stage, the feathers, the pasties and the catcalls, Mena Domina exudes seductiveness.

April 29, 2015 by Enrique Limón

As the World Burns

Thriller with a pedigree melds romance, comedy and a catastrophic threat to mankind … sound familiar?

Book Reviews We might as well get it out in the open right now, in case you are late to the party: Author Joe Hill is actually Joseph King—son of (prolific American horror heavyweight) Stephen King.

May 18, 2016 by Julie Ann Grimm

Press, Released

The Press at the Palace of the Governors kicks off weeklong celebration

Book Reviews Tom Leech, curator of the Press at the Palace of the Governors, is a busy man. “I’ve worked here for 11 years, and I’ve never had two days that were the same,” he says.

Jan. 15, 2013 by Robert Sobel

Absolutely Modern

Local independent bookstores, alive and well

Book Reviews When you come into contact with people who truly love what they do, their energy can be contagious. Such is the case with Nick Potter, owner of Nicholas Potter Bookseller, and Noemi de Bodisco and Sierra Logan of Op.Cit. Books.

Dec. 18, 2012 by Robert Sobel

Boats, Bikes and Blades

A man’s journey around the world

Book Reviews Circumnavigation: Magellan did it in a boat. John Glenn did it in a spaceship. Hell, Phileas Fogg even did it in a hot air balloon in the film Around the World in 80 Days (though, strangely enough, not in the novel on which it was based).

Nov. 13, 2012 by Ryan Collett

Middle of Nowhere

One man’s spiritual journey takes him all the way to Santa Fe

Book Reviews A priest who escaped from Nazi Germany, Father John accepts an assignment to travel to Santa Fe around the time of his grandmother’s death, which symbolizes the loss of everything he knows and loves. However, tragedy is not the focus of Gil Sanchez’ Viva Cristo Rey, and neither is history. Instead, the book offers a sentimental view of the conception of the Cristo Rey Church, the largest adobe structure in the northern hemisphere.

May 23, 2012 by Jackson Larson, Matthew Irwin

Freud or Fiction?

Cowboys, Crime Novels and the CIA

Book Reviews Michael McGarrity is a former deputy sheriff for Santa Fe County. For the release of his 13th novel, titled Hard Country: A Novel of the Old West, he asked Valerie Plame Wilson, a former CIA Operations Officer and author of Fair Game: My Life as a Spy, My Betrayal by the White House to interview him at Collected Works Bookstore.

May 09, 2012 by Jackson Larson

A New Home in Imagination

Native daughter brings Santa Fe experiences to Holocaust tale

Book Reviews Ramona Ausubel has found a way to let a story breathe while also giving great specificity to language—a rare trait among new authors.

Feb. 28, 2012 by Sara Malinowski

The Swedish West

Beautifully designed, photographed, written book misses opportunity

Book Reviews Promising to discover how people really live in our nation’s highly symbolic, deeply mythologized frontier, two Swedes venture to the American West with pen and camera.

Jan. 31, 2012 by Matthew Irwin

Undoing the Myth

Writer-director John Sayles discusses a career on the fringe

Book Reviews Take the US annexation of the Philippines. Around 1898, the US touted itself as an anti-imperialist nation, home of equality, but then it invaded a foreign nation under the auspices of white Christian duty: Save the heathen islanders. This, according to John Sayles, who visits Santa Fe to talk about his work, including the book A Moment in the Sun.

Jan. 17, 2012 by Matthew Irwin

Get off the Lawn

New book looks at the transformation of New Mexico’s plazas

Book Reviews Visit Santa Fe’s Plaza on any Saturday afternoon, and a diverse throng of locals and tourists, buskers and gawkers, buyers and sellers, and artists and lunch-eaters will be milling in and around it.

Nov. 16, 2011 by Hunter Riley

Calling It a Season

SFCMF says hasta luego

Classical Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival audiences could do the figuring-out for themselves at noon, Aug. 19, at the Lensic when Yefim Bronfman just about tore our heads off with his reading of Prokofiev’s fresh and fierce sonata.

Aug. 26, 2014 by John Stege

SFCMF’s Slow Wind-up

Mostly Mozart, magical Messiaen

Classical As these lazy August days dwindle, peak and pine, Santa Fe music-mavens can’t be faulted for feeling a bit sad that the crazy summer festival scene is nearly finito.

Aug. 20, 2014 by John Stege

The Music Goes Round and Round

Silence and riddles during SFCMF’s fourth week

Classical The other day an old pal recalled a little lecture delivered in this space a few years back. The gist? Will you audiences please, please stop already with those obligatory knee-jerk standing ovations? Save same for the real, rare spine-tingling conce

Aug. 13, 2014 by John Stege

Mostly About the Beethoven

SFCMF at work

Classical Those vigas and latillas and massive corbels in St. Francis Auditorium may still be vibrating after pianist Alessio Bax’s big bow-wow July 29 noon recital. At first glance his program looked a bit peculiar: Rachmaninoff and Mussorgsky

Aug. 05, 2014 by John Stege

Getting Dedicated

SFCMF @42

Classical What more appropriate opening for the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival’s 42nd season than Robert Schumann’s ecstatic song, “Widmung,” (“Dedication”) as transcribed for piano by Liszt? 

July 29, 2014 by John Stege

Enthusiasm, Thy Name Is Neikrug

Classical Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival’s long-time artistic director, Marc Neikrug, talks about the 2014 season, opening July 20 at St. Francis Auditorium.

July 15, 2014 by John Stege

IFAM Booth & Vendor Locator

2014 Official IFAM Guide

IFAM The Official Guide to IFAM 2014 - Artist and Vendor Booth Map

Aug. 19, 2014 by SFR

IFAM Rocks

New Market courts a younger demographic while still serving everyone

IFAM If you’ve lived around Santa Fe for any real amount of time, it was no doubt surprising to hear that some awesome renegade artists were splintering off from the mega Indian Market to form their own event in the Railyard.

Aug. 18, 2014 by Alex De Vore

Letter From the President

IFAM IFAM is more than just a Market. It is a movement. It was born of a group of artists with a vision. We wanted a show where we could come together to share our stories, our culture, our heritage and our legacies with you.

Aug. 18, 2014 by John Torres Nez

New Kids on the Market Block

Five artists on the rise discuss hopes for their first market experience

IFAM Though some might have been practicing art for most of their lives, this collection of emerging artists talk about what they expect during their first market experience. Come up and see them sometime (at their booth, that is).

Aug. 15, 2014 by Ian MacMillan

Miles To Go Before He Sleeps

Douglas Miles plays by his own set of rules

IFAM San Carlos Apache–Akimel O’odham artist Douglas Miles has so many moving parts, it’s sometimes difficult to keep track of how they all fit together.

Aug. 15, 2014 by Rob DeWalt

Happy Monsters and Other Creatures

Enter the world of Heidi K Brandow

IFAM I am going to ask you a very stereotypical question,” I say. Heidi Brandow nods. “Were you influenced by the skater-surfer culture in Hawaii?” She smiles big, getting the subtle humor.

Aug. 15, 2014 by Bett Williams

A Nifty Fifty-Ninth

A five-star summer

Opera The collective shoulder of the Santa Fe Opera, closing down its 59th season on Saturday, Aug. 29, has borne a few heavy crosses this summer.

Aug. 12, 2015 by John Stege

A Magic Mountain

That’s anything but cold

Opera Perched on its hill north of town, the Santa Fe Opera doesn’t shy away from nouveau.

Aug. 05, 2015 by John Stege

Infinite Finto

Mozart’s troubled school for lovers

Opera Forget Mozart—for now. Instead, be diverted with thoughts of Jerome Kern. Of Oscar Hammerstein II.

July 29, 2015 by John Stege

Salome Agonistes

Featuring tête de prophète vinaigrette

Opera Those three affable Princes of Serendip, patron saints of fortuitous coincidence, made their presence known here last week in a cheer-inducing pair of oddly complementary theatrical events.

July 22, 2015 by John Stege

Voices, Voices, Voices

This Rigoletto’s a contender

Opera Recent music venues here in the City Diff have been promoting those darn melodic earworms that do not go gently.

July 15, 2015 by John Stege

Napoleonic Tomfoolery

Getting regimented at the Opera

Opera Welcome, friends, to Cloud-cuckoo Land. No, stop. That’s that dead Greek guy. Um—Never-never Land? Uh-uh. The late Mr. Barrie dreamed that one up. How about Topsy-turvey-dom? Getting warmer, but no cigar.

July 08, 2015 by John Stege

Flowers, Fillies and Freud

SFO’s 5 for ‘15

Opera Listen up, opera fans: they’re back! Those iconic historic romantic white petunias out at the Santa Fe Opera, that is. Some pesky petunia malady had been blighting those fragrant posies for a while, but as you shall see and smell, it’s A-OK again.

July 01, 2015 by John Stege

SFO ‘14: Not Over Till…

August 23

Opera Sammy Cahn wrote the lyrics, and Ol’ Blue Eyes sang it first: “I’m oh, so glad we met the second time around.” Ergo, herewith another look at this season’s Santa Fe Opera summer offerings. 

Aug. 05, 2014 by John Stege

A Brilliant Sun

Worth the journey

Opera With permission, let me gently misapply the term to the mysterious beginnings of Huang Ruo’s first opera, Dr. Sun Yat-sen, whose American premiere just happened at the Santa Fe Opera.

July 29, 2014 by John Stege

SFO Gets The Bird

A deuce of an evening

Opera Expectations ran high about this new, bright-idea Mozart/Stravinsky pairing, both composers with long-standing connections with the SFO, and both captivating works with the potential to provide another enchanted evening.

July 22, 2014 by John Stege

Forgotten History

Uncovering the legacy of America’s all-black towns

Performing Arts Karla Slocum is an anthropology professor from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, studying the black history of Oklahoma as a local resident scholar at the School for Advanced Research. Think of her as a cross-country vagabond, but with a PhD.

Dec. 11, 2012 by Ryan Collett

Poetic License

Two poets diverge in a yellow wood (read: a local bookstore)

Performing Arts Last Saturday, Collected Works Bookstore hosted the second fall reading series of Muse Times Two, curated by Dana Levin and Carol Moldaw.

Nov. 20, 2012 by Robert Sobel

Like Mike

Yay! Comic Mike Birbiglia sleepwalks into town

Performing Arts With the success of his indie film Sleepwalk with Me, which he co-wrote, directed and stars in, it’s been a whirlwind year for comedian Mike Birbiglia; though he’ll be the first to brush off the “movie star” title. “My agent always tries to knock me down and say I’m not a movie star, but rather a movie starrer—which means I was the star in a movie, but I’m not an actual star,” Birbiglia tells SFR.

Sept. 19, 2012 by Enrique Limón

Children and Fools Speak True

Local theater collective dawns anew

Performing Arts A wise fool, says Devon Ludlow, managing director of Wise Fool New Mexico, is “one of those fabulous names…Jesters being able to speak the truth…idiocy and wisdom melding.” The medieval court jesters often interspersed truths, honest observations and wise words in their otherwise absurd performances.

Sept. 18, 2012 by Mia Rose Carbone

That’s All, Folks!

SFO and SFCMF bid adieu for the season

Performing Arts The acequia running nearby shows a few yellow leaves; too cool for breakfast outside today; the overgrown garden needs a firm hand. Summer is slowing and the summer music scene is finito. An imaginary curtain rang down at the Santa Fe Opera last Saturday night, and the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival closed up for the year. So now—a little accountability?

Aug. 29, 2012 by John Stege

Tonal Voice

Schoenberg dominates Chamber Music Festival’s final weeks

Performing Arts Take note, please, of a preliminary event at last Sunday’s Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival concert: the sight of a large, black-clad man being tugged through the crowded lobby at the Lensic by a small girl. The child? A determined young daughter. The gentleman? This season’s distinguished artist-in-residence, Alan Gilbert. Her urgent excuse? I didn’t ask.

Aug. 15, 2012 by John Stege

Clarinets of Every Size

Woodwinds shine at Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival

Performing Arts Every time I hear a fine, well-produced contralto voice, I get the chills. Maybe it goes back to my grandmother’s old Schumann-Heink 78s. Kathleen Ferrier’s “Embarme dich,” and anything else s

Aug. 08, 2012 by John Stege

Straussian Function

Arabella continues a rich tradition of German opera in SF

Performing Arts Anyone who’s been hanging around the Santa Fe Opera for any length of time has heard, until quite recently, a really terrific amount of Richard Strauss.

Aug. 01, 2012 by John Stege

Upping the Ante

Chamber Music Festival: manic brillance, rhapsodic climax

Performing Arts Forty years old already? It can’t be that long since I heard several concerts at the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival’s inaugural season—six Sunday afternoons back in 1973.

Aug. 01, 2012 by John Stege

A Thorough Rogering

The Santa Fe Opera’s King Roger stays focused

Performing Arts Ever since its 1926 premiere in Warsaw, Karol Szymanowski’s King Roger has been one of those conundrums of 20th-century music. Generically speaking, is it an opera? A dramatic oratorio? A morality play? Is it a work of penetrating insight into psycho-sexual complexities or a murky slog through mystico-symbological pretense?

July 25, 2012 by John Stege

SFR Picks: Healing Powers

Local artist creates beauty from trauma

Picks Therapeutic storytelling is the focus of Jodie Herrera’s work, and her paintings feature photorealistic women in the foreground, symbols and geometric shapes painted in petal and earth tones behind them.

June 22, 2016 by Maria Egolf-Romero

SFR Picks: Music on the Hillary

Hillary Smith and Soul Kitchen bring the feels to Music on the Hill

Picks We love that Santa Fe goes a little festival crazy during the summer months. It basically means that it’s easy to put together plans on almost any day or night of the week.

June 15, 2016 by Alex De Vore, Maria Egolf-Romero

SFR Picks: Bridging the Gap

The Bridge is Santa Fe’s most exciting new venue option

Picks Santa Fe Brewing Co. owner Brian Lock is well aware that the previous tenants of the venue aspect of his business could have given the space a bad name.

June 08, 2016 by Alex De Vore, Andrew Koss

SFR Picks: Trash Planet

Reuse-a-Palooza turns recycling and upcycling into a carnival

Picks “It seems to me that so much of the dialogue about climate change is really negative, and there’s this sense of community agency that gets lost,” Reunity Resources’ Juliana Ciano tells SFR.

SFR Picks: Horseplay

Baltimore weirdos change your definition of rock

Picks “Our name is actually a Lord of the Rings reference,” Horse Lords’ saxophonist/percussionist Andrew Bernstein says. Hailing from Baltimore, the band plays Thursday evening at Southside DIY venue/art space Radical Abacus.

May 25, 2016 by Alex De Vore, Maria Egolf-Romero

SFR Picks: Wize Up!

Break out the bong—Pato Banton’s coming to town

Picks If you’re a reggae fan, you surely know the name Pato Banton, even if it’s not the name the renowned musician started out with.

SFR Picks: Rawk!

Jesse Deluxe and Skylight join forces for good

Picks We all love Skylight and everything, but the fact is that they can be a little DJ-centric. We get it, that’s cool—you’ve got a business to run.

May 11, 2016 by Alex De Vore

SFR Picks: Leave Room for Inspiration

With nigh unbelievable range, a singer like Alicia Olatuja stands head and shoulders above

Picks In every generation, there are a mere handful of truly standout female vocalists. New York’s Alicia Olatuja, 29, is one such singer.

May 04, 2016 by Alex De Vore

SFR Picks: Visionary

The 6th Annual Outdoor Vision Fest changes how we think about art

Picks To think that we once lived in a pointless world where almost all art would sit motionlessly on some stupid blank wall, no audio component whatsoever, almost as if it were mocking us for standing there and staring silently back.

April 27, 2016 by Alex De Vore

SFR Picks: Big Fun

Gag us with a spoon … we like it

Picks Much of the popularity of 1988’s dark comedy cult hit Heathers is in its universally relatable themes. High school sucks (or sucked) for a lot of us.

April 20, 2016 by Alex De Vore

Game of Thrones for Noobs XX: Season Finale Edition

Season VI, Episode X: The Winds of Winter

Pop Culture A whole lot happened last week, but we can really just boil it down to one sentence: A couple of bastards went to war, and one of ’em had his face eaten by dogs. The end.

June 27, 2016 by Alex De Vore

Game of Thrones for Noobs XIX

Season VI, Episode IX: Battle of the Bastards

Pop Culture The slowness continued, as everyone in the land of Game of Thrones wandered around like effing molasses.

June 20, 2016 by Alex De Vore

Mirror's Meh-dge

DICE's 'Mirror's Edge' sequel just ain't that great

Pop Culture There are nearly a dozen K-Sec guards hot on my tail as I leap from the roof of the towering skyscraper, zip along a fortunately placed cable and land neatly on an outcropped catwalk.

June 14, 2016 by Alex De Vore

Game of Thrones for Noobs XVIII

Season VI, Episode VIII: No One

Pop Culture So last week, that one guy with the face burns was minding his own business and innocently building a tower for that dude from Deadwood, and then everybody got killed. 

June 13, 2016 by Alex De Vore

Game of Thrones for Noobs XVII

Season VI, Episode VII: The Broken Man

Pop Culture Last week settled into yet another fully boring episode within a sea of fully boring episodes. 

June 06, 2016 by Alex De Vore

Game of Thrones for Noobs XVI

Season VI, Episode VI: Blood of My Blood

Pop Culture Oh man, so everyone freaked out because Hodor could only say, “Hodor,” because Oat-Bran’s journey through time caused young Hodor to stroke the eff out.

May 30, 2016 by Alex De Vore

SFR Cruises Downtown for Lowrider Day (Video)

Pop Culture Did you make it down to the Plaza for Lowrider Day on Sunday, May 22? 

May 23, 2016 by Alex De Vore

Game of Thrones for Noobs XV

Season VI Episode V: The Door

Pop Culture The Story Thus Far (Heavy Spoilers) Last week’s episode sucked worse than the rest of the episodes of this season, and that’s saying something.

May 23, 2016 by Alex De Vore

Game On: 'Uncharted 4: A Thief's End'

A thoughtful and satisfying conclusion to the world of Nathan Drake and Crew

Pop Culture This is the last adventure for Nathan Drake and crew. 

May 17, 2016 by Alex De Vore

Game of Thrones for Noobs XIV: Book of the Stranger

Are we ever going to be not bored by this season?

Pop Culture The Story Thus Far (heavy spoilers!)Last week everyone just dicked around while we waited for Jon Snow to come back to life, which he did but it still sucked. 

May 16, 2016 by Alex De Vore

A Midsummer’s Midsummer

Side notes on a well-known Shakespearean comedy

Theater & Stage Reviews As a side note and perhaps to explain his decision to let his actors use their own voices in the Santa Fe Shakespeare Society production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, director Jerry Ferraccio says t

July 04, 2012 by Matthew Irwin

Picking at the bones of industry

Other People’s Money appeals to hearts and wallets

Theater & Stage Reviews Director Ron Bloomberg leans over to me at a recent rehearsal for the Santa Fe Playhouse production of Other People’s Money, and says, “This is one of the first plays to address vulture capitalism

June 13, 2012 by Matthew Irwin

Company’s out for summer

Dance performance strives to push the boundaries of, well, dance

Theater & Stage Reviews Arcos Dance artistic director Curtis Uhlemann describes the scene for “46 Thousand,” a piece he choreographed with his co-director Erica Gionfriddo: The scaffolds are black, the dancers wear black (their hair down) and musician Andy Primm sits above them with his drum kit, playing a piece inspired by the John Bonham solo “Bonzo’s Montreux.”

June 06, 2012 by Matthew Irwin

The Performance Community

The Peñasco Theatre builds community on the High Road

Theater & Stage Reviews From the street-side of The Peñasco Theatre, where a folksy mural tells of people building their community together, the theatre’s owner Alessandra Ogren walks me to the north side of the building where a new mural by Rebeka Tarín and Amaryllis de Jesus Moleski offers a meta-response to images on the front, mixing folk iconography with urban-contemporary references.

May 30, 2012 by Matthew Irwin

Love Rocks

Musical reintroduces the anarchist Emma Goldman

Theater & Stage Reviews Love & Emma Goldman: A Rock Opera is about the enduring human voice. The original production by Sarah-Jane Moody and Jeremy Bleich (aka the experimental pop duo GoGoSnapRadio) is also about taking action for one’s beliefs. It’s about violence, justice, freedom and love. It’s about Emma Goldman, the turn-of-the-century anarchist who spoke up, was deported and disappeared into history.

May 16, 2012 by Matthew Irwin

Chasing Fortune

The absurdity of just pursuits in Teatro Paraguas’ Fortunato

Theater & Stage Reviews The cast is rehearsing the last scene of Fortunato when I arrive at Teatro Paraguas’ new location, a few units down from its old black-box space in the Agua Fría Village. They’re having trouble finding momentum. Lines are forgotten. Props are dropped. Cues are missed. And the scene comes to a halt when actor Marcos Maez leans against a giant target, only to have it collapse behind him with a rattling crash and the sound of glass breaking.

April 25, 2012 by Matthew Irwin

Oil and Water

Nonparticipatory resistance against corporate domination

Theater & Stage Reviews I caused the 2010 BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. This is my conclusion after speaking with Argos MacCallum of Teatro Paraguas about the company’s reading of The Way of Water, Caridad Svich’s play about four people affected by said disaster.

April 18, 2012 by Matthew Irwin

Worlds Within Words

Theaterwork realizes the works and lives of four women poets

Theater & Stage Reviews David Olson’s mother and grandmother were poets. At dinner, Olson’s father, a Swedish immigrant, would leave a line of poetry under a dinner plate for Olson or one of his siblings to discover and

Feb. 14, 2012 by Matthew Irwin

Contemporaneous Celebrations

Wake up and happy birthday, music scene!

Theater & Stage Reviews Santa Fe’s contemporary music scene awakens from semi-hibernation with two important concerts this week. And they’re all about anniversaries.

June 21, 2011 by John Stege

Through the Lens

Lensic affiliates share their views

Theater & Stage Reviews The Lensic theater space turns 80 this year and simultaneously celebrates 10 years since it became the nonprofit Lensic Performing Arts Center. The Lensic marks this milestone with the same varied arsenal of events it has wielded throughout its history.

April 13, 2011 by Rani Molla

This Weekend

Beat the heat, or at least just live with it

Weekend Picks There's nothing cooler than a weekend full of fun, even if you feel like you're melting the minute you leave your house.

June 24, 2016 by SFR

This Weekend

Summertime, summertime, sum-sum-summertime

Weekend Picks We're hitting summer hard now, friends, but that just means about a bazillion more chances to party through the weekend with these enticing picks.

June 17, 2016 by SFR

This Weekend

Music, film and Greek festivals galore!

Weekend Picks So you've got our super-hot music issue at long last; now it's time to plan a super-hot weekend with our top picks.

June 10, 2016 by SFR

This Weekend

What's up now that it's hot? This stuff.

Weekend Picks Art, music, gear, repeat—how to do up the first real summer weekend right

June 03, 2016 by SFR

This Weekend

Bluegrass, bees and Beas.

Weekend Picks Whether you're food-ing, walking or checking out the best in local/touring music, plan your weekend right.

May 27, 2016 by SFR

This Weekend

Nuevo Mexico Por Vida!

Weekend Picks Lowriders, O’Keeffe and Lloyd Kiva New? It doesn’t get any more New Mexico than this.

May 20, 2016 by SFR

This Weekend

Monsters and Music and Showtunes, oh my!

Weekend Picks Make some monotypes, yet more monsters, dreamscape without Dennis Quaid.

May 13, 2016 by SFR

This Weekend

Magic Moments

Weekend Picks Mystic music, two kinds of dragons, fairy tale theater

May 06, 2016 by SFR

This Weekend

In 3-D!

Weekend Picks Comedy con Camille, music in 3D, Yankees and Rebs, big-top dreams.

April 29, 2016 by SFR

This Weekend

A musical to die for

Weekend Picks Eating out for charity. '80s movie the musical. The last dance for borrowed guitars.

April 22, 2016 by SFR
 

Morning Word: Wildfire 100 Percent Contained

Morning Word Officials are monitoring a 3-mile area near the Santa Fe watershed but say the fire that burned 7.6 acres is now out.  ... More

June 27, 2016 by Peter St. Cyr

Fire Starts in City Watershed

Major resources on tap to fight fire that began Thursday in the Santa Fe Watershed

Local News A small wildfire has ignited in the Santa Fe Municipal Watershed, just upstream of McClure Reservoir and in the wilderness portion of the watershed.  ... More

June 23, 2016 by Elizabeth Miller

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