Nov. 26, 2015

Seven Bucks? Woo-Hoo!

Guess you can’t get here from there…

Blue Corn Right now, if somebody said I had a choice of taking a commercial airline flight or eating a bucket of live cockroaches, my response would be, “Can I put some horseradish on those suckers?”

Nov. 25, 2015 by Robert Basler

We’re Number Two!

Makin’ a list, checkin’ it twice

Blue Corn You may have heard about a new one of those “Readers’ Choice” lists recently. This one, in Conde Nast Traveler magazine, revealed “The 15 Best Small Cities in the US.”

Nov. 11, 2015 by Robert Basler

Think of Your Career, Kid!

Did you say wicked, or wicket?

Blue Corn A year ago, I did a column headlined, “Say Cheese, Billy,” about New Mexico’s most notorious resident, Billy the Kid, who spent time here in the Santa Fe jail, and who was killed in the state back in 1881.

Oct. 28, 2015 by Robert Basler

The State I’m In…

Our breezes are balmy and so is the song

Blue Corn Hey, Bob! It’s me! How are you? You’re the inquisitive reader who speaks in boldface? Yes! I was hoping you could tell me about New Mexico’s official state song. Do we have one? Of course we do! Is it any good?

Oct. 21, 2015 by Robert Basler

I Dare You to Park Here

What unfriendly looks like on steroids

Blue Corn All things considered, I think Santa Fe is a pretty friendly place. Most of the drivers here will give you an amiable wave as they turn in front of you with no warning.

Oct. 07, 2015 by Robert Basler

Another Santa Fe Fable

What big teeth you have!

Blue Corn Once upon a time in Santa Fe, there lived a girl named Little Red Riding Hood.

Sept. 23, 2015 by Robert Basler

Baa Baa Black Sheep

Get your money for nothing, get your checks for free…

Blue Corn You spend years and years working at a profession you love—like, say, journalism. But then, you suddenly hear about a different job you never knew existed, and now you think you may have wasted your life.

Sept. 09, 2015 by Robert Basler

Heads I Win…

A trophy worth killing for

Blue Corn A few weeks ago, human beings around the world were sickened by the senseless slaughter of Cecil, the magnificent lion in Zimbabwe.

Aug. 26, 2015 by Robert Basler

Santa Feans for Whom?

Putting the lout back in clout

Blue Corn I don’t normally write about national politics in my column, but my editor says I owe you full disclosure, so here it is. I’ve recently become chairman of Santa Feans for Donald Trump, and, friends, I’m asking for your support.

Aug. 12, 2015 by Robert Basler

The Reign in Spain…

Those guys in metal suits are back!

Blue Corn Many of you may have read that Texas has decided to do something outrageous in its new social studies textbooks.

July 22, 2015 by Robert Basler

Not in My Yard

Born Here I’ve complained a lot in private conversations, as far back as I can remember, about the political climate in Santa Fe, and how it seems to favor a minority of wealthy, retired, white transplants that hide in the hills above downtown.

Nov. 25, 2015 by Miljen Aljinovic

Clown Car Go Boom

Born Here Friends, we need to sit and talk for a few minutes about the Republicans. I’m a little worried for them.

Nov. 11, 2015 by Miljen Aljinovic

My Private Eschaton

Born Here As we’ve briefly discussed before, much of my day-to-day life is tempered by a constant struggle with anxiety and depression.

Oct. 28, 2015 by Miljen Aljinovic

Brave New Romance

Born Here Of all the strange new things that shape the way we interact, I think Tinder may be the most interesting.

Oct. 14, 2015 by Miljen Aljinovic

Rest Stop in Hell

Born Here When I woke, my throat was dry and my back stiff from the position in which I had passed out in the front seat of the van.

Sept. 23, 2015 by Miljen Aljinovic

The Lonesome, Crowded West

Born Here Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.

Sept. 09, 2015 by Miljen Aljinovic

Apocalypse Now

Born Here If there is any doubt in your mind that the way we’re living right now is slowly choking our planet to death, I would encourage you to take a road trip out West and check out the prototypical post-apocalyptic wasteland we’re crafting in Southern California.

Aug. 26, 2015 by Miljen Aljinovic

Sun’s Coming Up

Born Here As the first faint glimmers of glowing blue creep around the Sangres, it really only strengthens my resolve. Birds are chirping outside.

Aug. 12, 2015 by Miljen Aljinovic

Art WWOOFing

Born Here A while back, I blew a year wandering around Europe, and ended up spending a large portion of my time WWOOFing.

July 29, 2015 by Miljen Aljinovic

Talking about the Gun

Born Here I shot a gun for the first time a week or two ago. In many ways, it was exactly what I expected it to be.

July 08, 2015 by Miljen Aljinovic

Real ID Crisis Is Forked Up

Here's the Thing In chess, the move is called a fork. A player advances a piece, or develops a play, in such a way that it can potentially capture two of an opponent’s highly valued pieces.

Nov. 18, 2015 by Andrea L Mays

We Shouldn’t Move

Here's the Thing Watching New Mexico Public Education Department officials continue to justify PARCC (Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers) testing reminds me of that joke, “What happens when an unstoppable force meets an immovable object?”

Nov. 04, 2015 by Andrea L Mays

Leave the Light On

Here's the Thing The brisk mornings, shorter days and chilly evening air announce that autumn has at last arrived in Santa Fe. And, as day doth follow night, with these changes come the higher costs to light and heat our homes.

Oct. 21, 2015 by Andrea L Mays

Murderous Excuses

Here's the Thing Last month, the Violence Policy Center released a report that opened with the following information: According to the US Department of Justice, “women are more likely to be victims of violent crimes committed by intimate partners than men, especial

Oct. 07, 2015 by Andrea L Mays

Judge Teachers Honorably

Here's the Thing Since 2009, 39 states and the District of Columbia have required that teacher evaluations be tied to student performance on standardized tests. And ours, of course, is one of them.

Sept. 16, 2015 by Andrea L Mays

‘As Usual’ Re-Explained

Here's the Thing Communication, spoken and written, can be a tricky enterprise. Even those of us who take a small measure of pride in being effective, if not exceptional, communicators sometimes miss the mark.

Sept. 02, 2015 by Andrea L Mays

Business as Usual

Here's the Thing In the span of a single week, I had reason to make several trips to three US Post Office locations in Santa Fe, at various times of the day.

Aug. 19, 2015 by Andrea L Mays

Is Tourism Exploitation?

Here's the Thing Many believe travel is the geographic cure for what ails us in our daily routines. Physically relocating allows us distance enough from home, and our homelands, to put our lives in clearer perspective.

Aug. 05, 2015 by Andrea L Mays

First, Do No Harm

Here's the Thing My earliest memory of national politics is gathering around the television to watch President Richard Nixon board Air Force One after resigning in disgrace.

July 15, 2015 by Andrea L Mays

An American Elegy

Here's the Thing Yes, we’ve been here before. But in the words of Edna St. Vincent Millay, “I am not resigned to the shutting away of loving hearts in the hard ground.” By now, you have heard about events of June 17, 2015.

July 01, 2015 by Andrea L Mays

Bigger than School

Why the perfect school system is out of reach—and always will be

School Reformed It’s been five years since SFR published my first column. I wrote about Brandon Brown, a former student of mine who walked across the graduation stage at Monte del Sol Charter School, received his diploma to loud applause, then died drunk.

Dec. 31, 2014 by Seth Biderman

Pick the Best Answer

Rethinking parent choice for standardized tests

School Reformed There’s a lot of talk these days, in the world of public education, about “parent choice” and “parent empowerment.”

Oct. 28, 2014 by Seth Biderman


Why school reform begins with us

School Reformed Our public school system, after all, is just a vessel, guided by the values of the community in which it sails.

July 29, 2014 by Seth Biderman

The Parent’s Dilemma

How much do you believe in public schools?

School Reformed My wife and I find ourselves confronting a tricky dilemma: Though I believe in the principle of free public education, I’m not feeling good about sending our 4-year-old daughter to the neighborhood public school for kindergarten in 2015. 

April 29, 2014 by Seth Biderman

Safe and Sound

Where school safety and sound education meet

School Reformed It’s a terrifying statistic, and not only for those of us who send our children to school every day, but also for the educators and lawmakers who hold the professional and moral responsibility of keeping our schools safe.

Jan. 29, 2014 by Seth Biderman

The Schools Push Back

The next step is pushing forward

School Reformed On Dec. 17, in response to state and federal demands that our schools pull themselves up by their bootstraps with a new battery of student tests and teacher evaluations, our local school board pushed

Jan. 01, 2014 by Seth Biderman

What Word?

Keeping the teacher in teaching by resisting the script

School Reformed A local elementary school teacher recently showed me the new manual she has been asked to use to teach reading to her students. I flipped it open and found a column of words, followed by these instruc

Oct. 30, 2013 by Seth Biderman

Why We Shouldn’t Use the Term Sex Slave

Anti-trafficking campaigns often miss the mark on helping victims

SEXed You’ve heard the sex trafficking story before. A woman from a foreign country is brought to live in the US in a dirty apartment and forced to have sex with people until the police step in, she escapes or she dies.

Feb. 04, 2015 by Hunter Riley

Contraception For Men Might Be On Its Way

What it is, how it works and what it means for reproductive freedom

SEXed Science is finally catching up to the 21st century by studying contraception for men that could be available as early as 2017. It’s about time

Jan. 06, 2015 by Hunter Riley

Learning to Break Up

A shame-free approach to ending relationships

SEXed Sex and breaking up have more in common than you might think. Both take a certain level of self-awareness, acceptance and communication to get your needs met. Unfortunately, we do a sub-par job of teaching people how to develop these skills.

Dec. 02, 2014 by Hunter Riley

Let’s Talk About Sex…ual Assault on College Campuses

Why you don’t have to be sorry forgetting real with college students

SEXed It makes me so sad that the University of New Mexico felt the need to apologize for offering sex education to students last month.

Nov. 04, 2014 by Hunter Riley

Addicted to Porn

Clinical psychologist David Ley questions common diagnosis

SEXed We need to start having open, honest discussions about why the problem of so-called porn addiction actually has less to do with titillating material, and more to do with how people use them.

Sept. 30, 2014 by Hunter Riley

Sex in Full Spectrum

Professional training with sex-positive spin comes to Southwestern College

SEXed We give health care workers (and people in general) the most basic information about sex, and that’s it.

Sept. 02, 2014 by Hunter Riley

Losing the Battle

What’s going wrong with the war for reproductive freedom?

SEXed The Supreme Court ruling on Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Stores is a major sign pointing to the way the health and reproductive rights of a woman are not valued in the same way a man’s are. Whether it’s restricting access to abortion or restricting

Aug. 05, 2014 by Hunter Riley

Trans Care

Counselor explains the impact of federal benefits for gender dysphoria treatment

SEXed If you’re basking in your post-Pride glow, add increased access to Medicare services by transgender people as another item on the list of reasons to rejoice!

July 01, 2014 by Hunter Riley

Zoning Regulations Cock Block Sex Shops

Santa Fe’s less-than-friendly zoning regulations make sexy business in Santa Fe hard, and not in a good way

SEXed Santa Fe is home to hundreds of art galleries, restaurants and other businesses that keep locals and tourists happy, healthy and entertained. Yet the city is lacking diversity in one industry: sex. I’m specifically talking about sex shops.

June 03, 2014 by Hunter Riley

Dating and Hooking Up with Technology

How the younger generation usesdating sites and hook-up apps to meet and greet

SEXed Using websites and apps to find a partner is becoming a centerpiece of dating for people in the technology age. 

May 06, 2014 by Hunter Riley

Metaphor and Metamorphosis

The Yawp Barbaric If you have ever watched Sherwin Bitsui recite his poems, you get the feeling he is bringing the news from some other realm—he leans hard into the microphone; his voice is forceful, commanding; his eyes move under their lids like those of someone in the midst of a troubling dream.

Aug. 20, 2014 by Jon Davis

Dramatic Setting

The Yawp Barbaric It’s July in Santa Fe, which means the skies darken most every afternoon and somebody somewhere gets rained on. And sometimes, during the July monsoons, the Institute of American Indian Arts’ campus starts to look like Provence.

July 15, 2014 by Jon Davis

Más Cerca: In search of the authentic

The Yawp Barbaric “Fin de la Fiesta” is a poem that seeks the authentic in an event, the Fiesta de Santa Fe, that sometimes struggles with authenticity, an event with its roots in conquest and branches in commerce.

June 17, 2014 by Jon Davis

Poisoned Well

Using language of commerce and war

The Yawp Barbaric The title of New Mexico State University poet Richard Greenfield’s most recent book, Tracer, is complicated. A tracer can be “a bullet or shell whose course is made visible in flight by a trail of flames or smoke, used to assist in aiming.”

May 20, 2014 by Jon Davis

Then. And Since Then

The Yawp Barbaric When Lou Reed died I revisited Carol Moldaw’s poem Lou Reed in Istanbul, which lets us glimpse the spirit of Lou Reed’s music at work in the world.

April 15, 2014 by Jon Davis

The Crux

The Yawp Barbaric David Mutschlecner, author most recently of Enigma and Light, lives in Los Alamos. He is a devoted reader of poetry and philosophy and a careful viewer of art. 

March 18, 2014 by Jon Davis

Loving the Arcane and Unusual

Metaphorical healing passes from poet to lover

The Yawp Barbaric If your first circle is anything like mine, it overlaps with Pound’s circle to create a small crescent. My knowledge of English is in that crescent, my remedial grasp of history, a dash of Dante, a high school encounter with Homer, brief excursions into the Provençal poets I read because Pound discussed them in his ABCs of Reading.

Feb. 18, 2014 by Jon Davis

Behold, Pointlessness

Law and babble and poetry

The Yawp Barbaric Last Thursday, I listened to four wildly diverse poets read their work aloud. A wonderful opportunity for some of us, was a minor plague, I’m sure, for others. I kept thinking, poor fiction writers and nonfiction writers; poor screenwriters; poor food preparers and bookstore owners; poor student workers wandering through the room.

Jan. 15, 2014 by Jon Davis

Avoidance and Confrontation

Dana Levin takes on women’s rights in the age of spectacle

The Yawp Barbaric One of the qualities I admire in Santa Fe poet Dana Levin’s work is her willingness to address difficult issues head on. In “Moo and Thrall,” the speaker of the poem goes looking for coffee and walks straight into a graphic anti-abortion demonstration.

Dec. 18, 2013 by Jon Davis

Heroine, translator, traitor

Reading poems with Santa Fe’s poet laureate

The Yawp Barbaric MALINCHÉ The native is shorn of the coarse, then cloaked in a brocade ellipsis. She figures this a better vocation than the other thing, the desert chingadera. They tell her, you're no good for

Nov. 19, 2013 by Jon Davis

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