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Home / Articles / Music / Music Features /  Ten Questions for DJ Melanie Moore
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Ten Questions for DJ Melanie Moore

The woman behind Sex on Vinyl gets personal

February 4, 2009, 12:00 am

Although she shares the same bloodline as Red Hot Chili Pepper Anthony Kiedis, local DJ Melanie Moore is an enigmatic artist in her own right.

For several years, the South Florida native trekked across the United States, enjoying a few stints in New York, Colorado and New Mexico. As a result, Moore was able to steadily evolve along with her music as her influences broadened.

A product of the early ’90s legendary DJ scene at Simon’s nightclub in Gainesville, Fla., Moore cites French DJ/producer Laurent Garnier among her most powerful inspirations. The talented Moore started mixing vinyl professionally in 1995, spinning house and techno into colorful textures of atomic sound. Drawing from world music, house and all varieties of electronica, Moore’s style is upbeat, positive and always danceable. A systems engineering consultant by day and a DJ by night, she has spent years balancing careers in both technology and music. 

In 2006, Moore formed Melanie Moore Media LLC and now divides her time between being a DJ, an entrepreneur and a producer for events such as The Santa Fe Film Festival. A three-time SFR readers’ pick for Best Local DJ, Moore also is well-known for her highly successful Sex on Vinyl Valentine’s Day parties. Joining forces with the New Mexico-based Donovan Livingston, the dynamic duo sets up four turntables and tag teams as the crowd dances the night away.

Miss Moore sits down with SFR to discuss sexy parties, getting in the mood and love at first sight.
 
SFR: How did the concept behind Sex on Vinyl evolve?
MM: Sex on Vinyl grew from my friendship with Donovan Livingston and our appearances together mixing on four turntables. This formula with dueling mixers and four turntables adds an increased momentum and a mysteriousness to the music. It became a feature at our events in the 1990s. After I moved to New York City in 1998, our four-turntable sessions became limited to a series of one-night stands on Valentine’s night.

Despite the brevity of our once-a-year flings…as DJs we felt uninhibited playing together and our romance continued. We felt great energy from our guests at those events, and the Sex on Vinyl moniker came to us around that time. Today, Donovan and I have an open relationship and we invite other DJs and entertainers to play with us at the Sex on Vinyl shows.

What’s one of the most romantic songs for Valentine’s Day?
An early ’90s house track, ‘Always’ (12 inch Underground Mix) by MK.

Were The Beatles right when they said ‘All You Need Is Love?’
What an infectious song; I almost start to believe it after the first few verses. All you need is love, plus a shared vision, trust and the ability to solve your problems. Maybe a line about a dishwasher would not hurt.

How can music make people feel sexy?
Recently I read that a person’s reaction to music can alter the diameter of one’s blood vessels. Music that makes a person feel happy expands the vessels and sends more blood to the heart and brain. There must be diameter settings for feeling sexy, confidant and, I dare say, bold.

What’s the best part about Valentine’s Day?
Shattering convictions that Valentine’s is for couples only and creating an atmosphere for everyone to enjoy, straight, gay, single or not.

What tracks do you play to get people ‘in the mood?’
‘Show Me Love’ by Robin S, ‘Mercy Rain’ by Peter Murphy, ‘Love and Happiness’ (Ray Jones Mix), ‘Dreamland’ by Bunny Wailer, ‘Do it in the Streets’ by Brad Walsh.

Do chocolates, flowers and candy hearts really work on the ladies?
Most definitely, but handwritten love letters and mix tapes get better results.

What are some sexy dance moves?
I have seen my share, including some not so great ones. I love to see people who are not necessarily lovers dance as close as possible without touching. Or when two strangers happen to get close on the dance floor, do a little spin together, but never speak a word. And when people take breaks on the sidelines to do calisthenics and take yoga positions before getting back on the dance floor, those are some of the best moves.

Do you believe in love at first sight and idea of a soul mate?
Yes, but I am not sure the two go hand in hand. Soul mates may have a better chance finding one another as kindred spirits verses hoping for a lighting bolt to hit them.

What’s the best story you’ve heard about how a couple got together? Best proposal?
At the moment, the best story comes from home. Last year, my father fell for a dear friend and colleague from 40 years prior. When they first met in the 1960s, both were happily married to other people. Things changed for them in 2008, and they share history, familiarity, a kindred spirit and unanticipated time together now. I have heard some great proposals, but the best are spoken when someone is down on their knee. I would not take it seriously otherwise.

 

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