Nov. 22, 2014

This Week's SFR Picks

Newsletters

Choose your newsletter(s):
* indicates required

SFR Events

Special Issues

 

 
Home / Articles / Food / Food Writing /  Eat It: Slow Down

Eat It: Slow Down

Stop and smell the produce

October 1, 2008, 12:00 am
Take a Class
10 am-3 pm, Saturday,
Oct. 11. 505-428-1270

Chef Tanya Story, who helps run the Culinary Arts Program at Santa Fe Community College, offers a day-long class in cooking, living and eating slowly, through the Continuing Education program at SFCC. The hands-on class helps participants make eating more enjoyable through discovering the origins of the food they eat. Coursework also includes information on local farms and cooking with local foods.

Take a Drive
Nothing braces the appetite like a short, scenic drive out of town­—just long enough to clear your head, but not so long that your dwindling fuel tank worries your hunger pangs into fiscal heartburn. The perennial favorite is La Mancha at The Galisteo Inn (9 La Vega, Galisteo 505-466-8200).

Visit Encantado (198 State Road 592, 505-946-5700) for jamón ibérico, luxe steak frites or bone-in New York strip steak with truffle fries and foie gras emulsion.

Or try the crab cakes at Lamy Station Café (150 Old Lamy Trail, Lamy, 505-466-1904), a refurbished railway car replete with stationary views and crimson place mats.

Take the Cake
The summer of 2008 was a great season for fruit, and the legacy promises to continue through fall. If you’ve ever wondered how to stake out preferred territory between crumbles, crisps, cobblers, slumps, grunts, buckles, pandowdies, betties, galettes and pies, let this be the autumn of your self-discovery. How do you like them apples? Fall fruits take wonderfully to baking, poaching and roasting with spices, nuts, sweet essences and aromatics. ’Tis the season for pears and quinces, too, all begging to be made into something delicious and shared, or canned and preserved, and put up in the pantry for winter. With the new Farmers Market at the Railyard, shopping for produce has never felt like less of a chore.

 

comments powered by Disqus
 
Close
Close
Close