Beef tartare with avocado, yuzu kosho, shiso, finger limes, crispy lotus root and farm quail egg yolk. 218 Camino La Tierra, 983-2100 Dinner Tuesday-Saturday Arroyo Vino The Champagne dressing on the harvest salad ($14) was probably the best I’ve ever tasted on a field of greens, almost reason enough to dine at Arroyo Vino. It’s always nice to experience amazing before the main course, in this case, lobster tail a la plancha ($39) with sweet corn risotto. It’s hard to compete against a piece of succulent tail from the sea, especially when it’s cooked over a flat-iron grill, Mexican style. And the risotto was equally awesome, although I didn’t taste as much sweet as I did corn, something I was ultimately compensated for in a limeade soda ($3) to wash it down. Part club soda and one-quarter syrup with a few squeezed limes, the bartender was beyond fast. My date ordered the cedar plank Atlantic salmon ($33), with crab stuffed squash blossom, roasted corn and red pepper coulis, and after tasting from her plate, the corn and the red pepper were as tasty as the salad’s Champagne dressing, rounding off the dinner like bookends. -TR
Beef tartare with avocado, yuzu kosho, shiso, finger limes, crispy lotus root and farm quail egg yolk. 218 Camino La Tierra, 983-2100 Dinner Tuesday-Saturday Arroyo Vino The Champagne dressing on the harvest salad ($14) was probably the best I’ve ever tasted on a field of greens, almost reason enough to dine at Arroyo Vino. It’s always nice to experience amazing before the main course, in this case, lobster tail a la plancha ($39) with sweet corn risotto. It’s hard to compete against a piece of succulent tail from the sea, especially when it’s cooked over a flat-iron grill, Mexican style. And the risotto was equally awesome, although I didn’t taste as much sweet as I did corn, something I was ultimately compensated for in a limeade soda ($3) to wash it down. Part club soda and one-quarter syrup with a few squeezed limes, the bartender was beyond fast. My date ordered the cedar plank Atlantic salmon ($33), with crab stuffed squash blossom, roasted corn and red pepper coulis, and after tasting from her plate, the corn and the red pepper were as tasty as the salad’s Champagne dressing, rounding off the dinner like bookends. -TR

/end pic-cntxt

Arroyo Vino

The Champagne dressing on the harvest salad ($14) was probably the best I’ve ever tasted on a field of greens, almost reason enough to dine at Arroyo Vino. It’s always nice to experience amazing before the main course, in this case, lobster tail a la plancha ($39) with sweet corn risotto. It’s hard to compete against a piece of succulent tail from the sea, especially when it’s cooked over a flat-iron grill, Mexican style. And the risotto was equally awesome, although I didn’t taste as much sweet as I did corn, something I was ultimately compensated for in a limeade soda ($3) to wash it down. Part club soda and one-quarter syrup with a few squeezed limes, the bartender was beyond fast. My date ordered the cedar plank Atlantic salmon ($33), with crab stuffed squash blossom, roasted corn and red pepper coulis, and after tasting from her plate, the corn and the red pepper were as tasty as the salad’s Champagne dressing, rounding off the dinner like bookends.

-TR

/end description

 Atris Combo with relleno, enchilada, taco, posole and beans. 193 Paseo de Peralta, 983-7401 Lunch and dinner daily; breakfast Saturday and Sunday Atrisco Café The cute little lamb on the restaurant logo isn’t just for looks. The famed Talus Wind Ranch in Galisteo is the source for their roasted leg of lamb burrito with red chile ($12.50) and everything else that baas from the menu’s daily specials. Find all the traditional New Mexican dishes that you desire, and expect them to be executed with care. Slurp up a bowl of menudo ($7.95), which restaurateur George Gundrey claims is a “scientifically proven hangover cure”; spoon out a lovely cup of pureed black bean soup ($2.95) that has a slight kick along with the strong flavors of cilantro; or inhale the green chile stew, a version with huge pieces of potato and chunks of tender beef topped with a ladle-full of spicy chopped chile ($8.95/bowl, $5.25/cup). Wash it down with one of the signature cocktails patented by bartender Mary Jane Chavez such as the “Horny Juanita,” a tequila creation that also includes raspberry Chambord, fresh berries and a squeeze of lime with a sugar rim ($9). Grab the honey and make the sopaipilla your final act, unless you saved room for flan. -JAG
Atris Combo with relleno, enchilada, taco, posole and beans. 193 Paseo de Peralta, 983-7401 Lunch and dinner daily; breakfast Saturday and Sunday Atrisco Café The cute little lamb on the restaurant logo isn’t just for looks. The famed Talus Wind Ranch in Galisteo is the source for their roasted leg of lamb burrito with red chile ($12.50) and everything else that baas from the menu’s daily specials. Find all the traditional New Mexican dishes that you desire, and expect them to be executed with care. Slurp up a bowl of menudo ($7.95), which restaurateur George Gundrey claims is a “scientifically proven hangover cure”; spoon out a lovely cup of pureed black bean soup ($2.95) that has a slight kick along with the strong flavors of cilantro; or inhale the green chile stew, a version with huge pieces of potato and chunks of tender beef topped with a ladle-full of spicy chopped chile ($8.95/bowl, $5.25/cup). Wash it down with one of the signature cocktails patented by bartender Mary Jane Chavez such as the “Horny Juanita,” a tequila creation that also includes raspberry Chambord, fresh berries and a squeeze of lime with a sugar rim ($9). Grab the honey and make the sopaipilla your final act, unless you saved room for flan. -JAG

/end pic-cntxt

Atrisco Café

The cute little lamb on the restaurant logo isn’t just for looks. The famed Talus Wind Ranch in Galisteo is the source for their roasted leg of lamb burrito with red chile ($12.50) and everything else that baas from the menu’s daily specials. Find all the traditional New Mexican dishes that you desire, and expect them to be executed with care. Slurp up a bowl of menudo ($7.95), which restaurateur George Gundrey claims is a “scientifically proven hangover cure”; spoon out a lovely cup of pureed black bean soup ($2.95) that has a slight kick along with the strong flavors of cilantro; or inhale the green chile stew, a version with huge pieces of potato and chunks of tender beef topped with a ladle-full of spicy chopped chile ($8.95/bowl, $5.25/cup). Wash it down with one of the signature cocktails patented by bartender Mary Jane Chavez such as the “Horny Juanita,” a tequila creation that also includes raspberry Chambord, fresh berries and a squeeze of lime with a sugar rim ($9). Grab the honey and make the sopaipilla your final act, unless you saved room for flan.

-JAG

/end description

 Bite Burger with five roasted chiles, bacon, avocado and cheese. 502 Old Santa Fe Trail, 469-2345 Open for lunch Monday-Saturday Bang Bite How good are the burgers at Enrique Guerrero’s bright orange stand? Good enough to have won the coveted Green Chile Cheeseburger Smackdown. Good enough to be the burger we chose to grace the opener for this section. Good enough to try to give them up for Lent, only to be praying for forgiveness to La Conquistadora four days after for breaking your promise. Offering “a broad spectrum of goodies” and working under the motto, “Eat clean. Play dirty,” the burgers here range from the bunless “Stripper burger” ($9.75) to the “Oh Papi” ($10.50), which comes with a generous slice of sharp cheddar, bacon for days and garlic aioli. You can also veer off the burgers and indulge in a tofu fajita sammie ($9.50) that tastes too damn good to be healthy or any of their “Things with cheese,” including the pulled pork-topped mac ’n’ cheese ($10.25), or any of the four “Grilled cheese things” ($8.25 and up). Now, if you’ll excuse me, I’m off to pray the rosary. -EL
Bite Burger with five roasted chiles, bacon, avocado and cheese. 502 Old Santa Fe Trail, 469-2345 Open for lunch Monday-Saturday Bang Bite How good are the burgers at Enrique Guerrero’s bright orange stand? Good enough to have won the coveted Green Chile Cheeseburger Smackdown. Good enough to be the burger we chose to grace the opener for this section. Good enough to try to give them up for Lent, only to be praying for forgiveness to La Conquistadora four days after for breaking your promise. Offering “a broad spectrum of goodies” and working under the motto, “Eat clean. Play dirty,” the burgers here range from the bunless “Stripper burger” ($9.75) to the “Oh Papi” ($10.50), which comes with a generous slice of sharp cheddar, bacon for days and garlic aioli. You can also veer off the burgers and indulge in a tofu fajita sammie ($9.50) that tastes too damn good to be healthy or any of their “Things with cheese,” including the pulled pork-topped mac ’n’ cheese ($10.25), or any of the four “Grilled cheese things” ($8.25 and up). Now, if you’ll excuse me, I’m off to pray the rosary. -EL

/end pic-cntxt

Bang Bite

How good are the burgers at Enrique Guerrero’s bright orange stand? Good enough to have won the coveted Green Chile Cheeseburger Smackdown. Good enough to be the burger we chose to grace the opener for this section. Good enough to try to give them up for Lent, only to be praying for forgiveness to La Conquistadora four days after for breaking your promise. Offering “a broad spectrum of goodies” and working under the motto, “Eat clean. Play dirty,” the burgers here range from the bunless “Stripper burger” ($9.75) to the “Oh Papi” ($10.50), which comes with a generous slice of sharp cheddar, bacon for days and garlic aioli. You can also veer off the burgers and indulge in a tofu fajita sammie ($9.50) that tastes too damn good to be healthy or any of their “Things with cheese,” including the pulled pork-topped mac ’n’ cheese ($10.25), or any of the four “Grilled cheese things” ($8.25 and up). Now, if you’ll excuse me, I’m off to pray the rosary.

-EL

/end description

 Tenderloin steak tartare, fresh farm eggs and house potato chips. 451 W Alameda St., 982-6297 Dinner Tuesday-Saturday Bouche Bouche feels like a place worth coming home to stay. Pull up a seat on their patio to enjoy dinner with a sunset-strewn sky over the top of their walled garden, or take a table indoors, among the hardwood floors and fireplace that recall a country coziness without overstating the point. Chef Charles Dale strolls the tables to check in on those enjoying a flawless and approachable menu. Make no mistake—while the wine list may be four pages (and wait staff happy to counsel you through those difficult choices) and the dinner menu a quarter-page, the emphasis is on well-considered food that draws from local and sustainable choices and the very best of French cuisine. Approachably casual black mussels in white wine and red chile sauce ($16/$26) are worth their weight in tiny forks—and, naturally, sneaking a dip of the housemade bread into. A mountain of truffle frites ($7/$9) dense with umami makes good company. Finish off with crème brûlée or the tart of the evening, which on our visit was built around all the natural sweetness of Colorado peaches. -EM
Tenderloin steak tartare, fresh farm eggs and house potato chips. 451 W Alameda St., 982-6297 Dinner Tuesday-Saturday Bouche Bouche feels like a place worth coming home to stay. Pull up a seat on their patio to enjoy dinner with a sunset-strewn sky over the top of their walled garden, or take a table indoors, among the hardwood floors and fireplace that recall a country coziness without overstating the point. Chef Charles Dale strolls the tables to check in on those enjoying a flawless and approachable menu. Make no mistake—while the wine list may be four pages (and wait staff happy to counsel you through those difficult choices) and the dinner menu a quarter-page, the emphasis is on well-considered food that draws from local and sustainable choices and the very best of French cuisine. Approachably casual black mussels in white wine and red chile sauce ($16/$26) are worth their weight in tiny forks—and, naturally, sneaking a dip of the housemade bread into. A mountain of truffle frites ($7/$9) dense with umami makes good company. Finish off with crème brûlée or the tart of the evening, which on our visit was built around all the natural sweetness of Colorado peaches. -EM

/end pic-cntxt

Bouche

Bouche feels like a place worth coming home to stay. Pull up a seat on their patio to enjoy dinner with a sunset-strewn sky over the top of their walled garden, or take a table indoors, among the hardwood floors and fireplace that recall a country coziness without overstating the point. Chef Charles Dale strolls the tables to check in on those enjoying a flawless and approachable menu. Make no mistake—while the wine list may be four pages (and wait staff happy to counsel you through those difficult choices) and the dinner menu a quarter-page, the emphasis is on well-considered food that draws from local and sustainable choices and the very best of French cuisine. Approachably casual black mussels in white wine and red chile sauce ($16/$26) are worth their weight in tiny forks—and, naturally, sneaking a dip of the housemade bread into. A mountain of truffle frites ($7/$9) dense with umami makes good company. Finish off with crème brûlée or the tart of the evening, which on our visit was built around all the natural sweetness of Colorado peaches.

-EM

/end description

 Bengal chicken and pineapple salad with toasted macadamia nuts. 121 Don Gaspar Ave., 983-9340 Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily Café Pasqual’s If you’re single and scared to eat at the community table at Café Pasqual’s, just take a seat and order the BLT and use a little BLT courage. The sandwich, loaded with green chile and chile-rubbed bacon ($16.95), is definitely a conversation starter. It’s also an example of how chile can be incorporated into just about every facet of a sandwich without making your eyes water. The bacon is thick, not greasy, and not overdone, making the lettuce, mayonnaise and tomatoes even better. And here’s the kicker: The chile cornbread, onto which this great tasting sand goes, doesn’t crumble under the weight, like your mother’s BLT on white bread. You’ve also got a choice of home fries or a salad. For dessert, try the medjool date shake ($11). It tastes like a melted pie inside a cup. As a starter, I had the Blue Sky organic ginger ale ($2.75). Which brings me to the only pitfall, perhaps: In its emphasis to be organic, it’d be nice to be able to order a diet Coke from time to time. But other than that, this BLT was one of the best sandwiches I’ve had in Santa Fe in quite a long time. And the people at the community table were wishing I’d shut up about it. -TR
Bengal chicken and pineapple salad with toasted macadamia nuts. 121 Don Gaspar Ave., 983-9340 Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily Café Pasqual’s If you’re single and scared to eat at the community table at Café Pasqual’s, just take a seat and order the BLT and use a little BLT courage. The sandwich, loaded with green chile and chile-rubbed bacon ($16.95), is definitely a conversation starter. It’s also an example of how chile can be incorporated into just about every facet of a sandwich without making your eyes water. The bacon is thick, not greasy, and not overdone, making the lettuce, mayonnaise and tomatoes even better. And here’s the kicker: The chile cornbread, onto which this great tasting sand goes, doesn’t crumble under the weight, like your mother’s BLT on white bread. You’ve also got a choice of home fries or a salad. For dessert, try the medjool date shake ($11). It tastes like a melted pie inside a cup. As a starter, I had the Blue Sky organic ginger ale ($2.75). Which brings me to the only pitfall, perhaps: In its emphasis to be organic, it’d be nice to be able to order a diet Coke from time to time. But other than that, this BLT was one of the best sandwiches I’ve had in Santa Fe in quite a long time. And the people at the community table were wishing I’d shut up about it. -TR

/end pic-cntxt

Café Pasqual’s

If you’re single and scared to eat at the community table at Café Pasqual’s, just take a seat and order the BLT and use a little BLT courage. The sandwich, loaded with green chile and chile-rubbed bacon ($16.95), is definitely a conversation starter. It’s also an example of how chile can be incorporated into just about every facet of a sandwich without making your eyes water. The bacon is thick, not greasy, and not overdone, making the lettuce, mayonnaise and tomatoes even better. And here’s the kicker: The chile cornbread, onto which this great tasting sand goes, doesn’t crumble under the weight, like your mother’s BLT on white bread. You’ve also got a choice of home fries or a salad. For dessert, try the medjool date shake ($11). It tastes like a melted pie inside a cup. As a starter, I had the Blue Sky organic ginger ale ($2.75). Which brings me to the only pitfall, perhaps: In its emphasis to be organic, it’d be nice to be able to order a diet Coke from time to time. But other than that, this BLT was one of the best sandwiches I’ve had in Santa Fe in quite a long time. And the people at the community table were wishing I’d shut up about it.

-TR

/end description

 Chocolate Bundt cake and cinnamon swirl coffee cake. 930 Baca St., 995-1105 Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily Counter Culture Café With service of all three meals nearly every day in its bustling community room and on two outdoor patios, including under a new shade structure in the front, eating here is a low-key, cash-only affair that gives you time to contemplate a constantly changing decorative scheme featuring local artists. Yet the grub is far from simple. Veggie frittatas ($10) and fried egg sandwiches ($5.50) are breakfast musts alongside endless urns of coffee, if you can manage to get through the checkout line without picking up a cinnamon roll the size of your face (available only on Wednesdays and weekends). A slab of portobello between two slices of focaccia joins other lunch offerings that can be paired with a tasty salad (blessedly absent iceberg lettuce) or a cup of the spicy Thai coconut salmon soup that keeps diners returning year after. And the shifting dinner menu, sadly not available on Sundays or Mondays, which can include a craft bottled beer and a selection of wine, treats with dishes from the grill such as skin-on rainbow trout ($13.25) served with a dill cream sauce and crispy potato croquette. -JAG
Chocolate Bundt cake and cinnamon swirl coffee cake. 930 Baca St., 995-1105 Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily Counter Culture Café With service of all three meals nearly every day in its bustling community room and on two outdoor patios, including under a new shade structure in the front, eating here is a low-key, cash-only affair that gives you time to contemplate a constantly changing decorative scheme featuring local artists. Yet the grub is far from simple. Veggie frittatas ($10) and fried egg sandwiches ($5.50) are breakfast musts alongside endless urns of coffee, if you can manage to get through the checkout line without picking up a cinnamon roll the size of your face (available only on Wednesdays and weekends). A slab of portobello between two slices of focaccia joins other lunch offerings that can be paired with a tasty salad (blessedly absent iceberg lettuce) or a cup of the spicy Thai coconut salmon soup that keeps diners returning year after. And the shifting dinner menu, sadly not available on Sundays or Mondays, which can include a craft bottled beer and a selection of wine, treats with dishes from the grill such as skin-on rainbow trout ($13.25) served with a dill cream sauce and crispy potato croquette. -JAG

/end pic-cntxt

Counter Culture Café

With service of all three meals nearly every day in its bustling community room and on two outdoor patios, including under a new shade structure in the front, eating here is a low-key, cash-only affair that gives you time to contemplate a constantly changing decorative scheme featuring local artists. Yet the grub is far from simple. Veggie frittatas ($10) and fried egg sandwiches ($5.50) are breakfast musts alongside endless urns of coffee, if you can manage to get through the checkout line without picking up a cinnamon roll the size of your face (available only on Wednesdays and weekends). A slab of portobello between two slices of focaccia joins other lunch offerings that can be paired with a tasty salad (blessedly absent iceberg lettuce) or a cup of the spicy Thai coconut salmon soup that keeps diners returning year after. And the shifting dinner menu, sadly not available on Sundays or Mondays, which can include a craft bottled beer and a selection of wine, treats with dishes from the grill such as skin-on rainbow trout ($13.25) served with a dill cream sauce and crispy potato croquette.

-JAG

/end description

 The Mother of All Green Chile Cheeseburgers. 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Lunch and dinner daily The Cowgirl BBQ The everlasting Guadalupe Steet joint is the only option when it comes for honest, unpretentious grub, accompanied by sweet tunes in the form of an ever-revolving cast of talent that call the Cowgirl their stage any given night. Featuring daily food specials, a stocked taproom and weekly karaoke, the family-friendly beacon of downhome serves up glorious comfort food like the stick-to-your-ribs 12-hour mesquite-smoked bunkhouse brisket ($15), the petite sirloin ($16), which comes with hand-cut frites and grilled veggies, and the elk, venison and buffalo “Game burger” ($15). During my most recent drop-in, my romantic table for one saw both the cabeza de ajo (a roasted full head of garlic surrounded by magma-hot melted Jack cheese) and my steadfast, the fried chicken-topped green chile mac ‘n’ cheese ($13), paraded through. A couple of hours after my meal, I still was reflecting on just how memorable it was and how I could still smell the garlic on me. Yep, #foreveralone. -EL
The Mother of All Green Chile Cheeseburgers. 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Lunch and dinner daily The Cowgirl BBQ The everlasting Guadalupe Steet joint is the only option when it comes for honest, unpretentious grub, accompanied by sweet tunes in the form of an ever-revolving cast of talent that call the Cowgirl their stage any given night. Featuring daily food specials, a stocked taproom and weekly karaoke, the family-friendly beacon of downhome serves up glorious comfort food like the stick-to-your-ribs 12-hour mesquite-smoked bunkhouse brisket ($15), the petite sirloin ($16), which comes with hand-cut frites and grilled veggies, and the elk, venison and buffalo “Game burger” ($15). During my most recent drop-in, my romantic table for one saw both the cabeza de ajo (a roasted full head of garlic surrounded by magma-hot melted Jack cheese) and my steadfast, the fried chicken-topped green chile mac ‘n’ cheese ($13), paraded through. A couple of hours after my meal, I still was reflecting on just how memorable it was and how I could still smell the garlic on me. Yep, #foreveralone. -EL

/end pic-cntxt

The Cowgirl BBQ

The everlasting Guadalupe Steet joint is the only option when it comes for honest, unpretentious grub, accompanied by sweet tunes in the form of an ever-revolving cast of talent that call the Cowgirl their stage any given night. Featuring daily food specials, a stocked taproom and weekly karaoke, the family-friendly beacon of downhome serves up glorious comfort food like the stick-to-your-ribs 12-hour mesquite-smoked bunkhouse brisket ($15), the petite sirloin ($16), which comes with hand-cut frites and grilled veggies, and the elk, venison and buffalo “Game burger” ($15). During my most recent drop-in, my romantic table for one saw both the cabeza de ajo (a roasted full head of garlic surrounded by magma-hot melted Jack cheese) and my steadfast, the fried chicken-topped green chile mac ‘n’ cheese ($13), paraded through. A couple of hours after my meal, I still was reflecting on just how memorable it was and how I could still smell the garlic on me. Yep, #foreveralone.

-EL

/end description

 Goat torta with goat barbacoa, apples and housemade habanero goat cheese spread. 2860 Cerrillos Road, Ste. A1, 471-0043 Lunch and dinner daily Dr. Field Goods If you want to be daring and try some goat meat for the first time in the history of your palate, then head to Dr. Field Goods Kitchen and wash it down with some housemade habanero that’s got a little honey in it. That should do the trick. And if you’re one who likes a spicy sandwich, then that’s even more of a reason to give the goat torta ($14) a whirl. The habanero has just enough kick to override the strong goat meat, and the goat cheese itself makes this rank among the more unique sandwiches around town. This kitchen, located in a nondescript strip mall anchored by a Big 5 Sporting Goods, is anything but nondescript. The inside has all the feeling of a micro-brewery, and just about everything to come out of the kitchen is specially crafted, including the soda drinks. Like the orange cream soda ($4), with fresh squeezed orange, simple syrup and soda water. The only thing perhaps lacking in this entire lunch was the potato fries. They weren’t bad, but they were up against some hard competition. -TR
Goat torta with goat barbacoa, apples and housemade habanero goat cheese spread. 2860 Cerrillos Road, Ste. A1, 471-0043 Lunch and dinner daily Dr. Field Goods If you want to be daring and try some goat meat for the first time in the history of your palate, then head to Dr. Field Goods Kitchen and wash it down with some housemade habanero that’s got a little honey in it. That should do the trick. And if you’re one who likes a spicy sandwich, then that’s even more of a reason to give the goat torta ($14) a whirl. The habanero has just enough kick to override the strong goat meat, and the goat cheese itself makes this rank among the more unique sandwiches around town. This kitchen, located in a nondescript strip mall anchored by a Big 5 Sporting Goods, is anything but nondescript. The inside has all the feeling of a micro-brewery, and just about everything to come out of the kitchen is specially crafted, including the soda drinks. Like the orange cream soda ($4), with fresh squeezed orange, simple syrup and soda water. The only thing perhaps lacking in this entire lunch was the potato fries. They weren’t bad, but they were up against some hard competition. -TR

/end pic-cntxt

Dr. Field Goods

If you want to be daring and try some goat meat for the first time in the history of your palate, then head to Dr. Field Goods Kitchen and wash it down with some housemade habanero that’s got a little honey in it. That should do the trick. And if you’re one who likes a spicy sandwich, then that’s even more of a reason to give the goat torta ($14) a whirl. The habanero has just enough kick to override the strong goat meat, and the goat cheese itself makes this rank among the more unique sandwiches around town. This kitchen, located in a nondescript strip mall anchored by a Big 5 Sporting Goods, is anything but nondescript. The inside has all the feeling of a micro-brewery, and just about everything to come out of the kitchen is specially crafted, including the soda drinks. Like the orange cream soda ($4), with fresh squeezed orange, simple syrup and soda water. The only thing perhaps lacking in this entire lunch was the potato fries. They weren’t bad, but they were up against some hard competition.

-TR

/end description

 Ceviche with young ginger, radish, red onion and coconut milk. 222 N Guadalupe St., 954-1635 Lunch Saturday and Sunday; dinner daily Fire & Hops Beer and burgers. Chocolate and whipped cream. Tacos and cider. These are combinations that win every time. OK, maybe not that last one. But if both are selected from the menu at this northside gastropub, the chances are good that culinary victory is still in sight. While the restaurant serves entrees, its small plates seem to better match the feel of what’s in and around the kitchen. Share the flavorful and tender Kalua pork tacos with kimchi, radish and green onion ($9 for three) paired with a dry Santa Sidra local apple cider ($10). You might not want to share the poutine, though. The pile of handcut fries ($9) smothered in green chile gravy with cheese curds and bacon will have you pulling it closer to your own plate. Bonus: Mom will be proud of you for eating the surprisingly delicious crispy Brussels sprouts tossed with lime juice and fish sauce to finish ($6), which we’re sure retain all their nutritional value despite the whole “fried” part. -JAG
Ceviche with young ginger, radish, red onion and coconut milk. 222 N Guadalupe St., 954-1635 Lunch Saturday and Sunday; dinner daily Fire & Hops Beer and burgers. Chocolate and whipped cream. Tacos and cider. These are combinations that win every time. OK, maybe not that last one. But if both are selected from the menu at this northside gastropub, the chances are good that culinary victory is still in sight. While the restaurant serves entrees, its small plates seem to better match the feel of what’s in and around the kitchen. Share the flavorful and tender Kalua pork tacos with kimchi, radish and green onion ($9 for three) paired with a dry Santa Sidra local apple cider ($10). You might not want to share the poutine, though. The pile of handcut fries ($9) smothered in green chile gravy with cheese curds and bacon will have you pulling it closer to your own plate. Bonus: Mom will be proud of you for eating the surprisingly delicious crispy Brussels sprouts tossed with lime juice and fish sauce to finish ($6), which we’re sure retain all their nutritional value despite the whole “fried” part. -JAG

/end pic-cntxt

Fire & Hops

Beer and burgers. Chocolate and whipped cream. Tacos and cider. These are combinations that win every time. OK, maybe not that last one. But if both are selected from the menu at this northside gastropub, the chances are good that culinary victory is still in sight. While the restaurant serves entrees, its small plates seem to better match the feel of what’s in and around the kitchen. Share the flavorful and tender Kalua pork tacos with kimchi, radish and green onion ($9 for three) paired with a dry Santa Sidra local apple cider ($10). You might not want to share the poutine, though. The pile of handcut fries ($9) smothered in green chile gravy with cheese curds and bacon will have you pulling it closer to your own plate. Bonus: Mom will be proud of you for eating the surprisingly delicious crispy Brussels sprouts tossed with lime juice and fish sauce to finish ($6), which we’re sure retain all their nutritional value despite the whole “fried” part.

-JAG

/end description

 Green chile chicken burrito. 4354 Cerrillos Road, 471-5420 Breakfast lunch and dinner Monday-Saturday; Breakfast and lunch Sunday Horseman’s Haven Sharing its real estate with a gas station, the Haven is where you come to fill yourself up with some of the most delectable home-style dishes around and green chile hotter than Satan’s discharge. Take your pick from the menu, the Romeros have you covered. Be it with an incomparable chorizo breakfast ($9.25), chicken-stuffed quesadillas ($9.95), “Mucho burgers” ($6.25 and up) and an in-house specialty, the 3-D ground beef burrito ($8.95). On a recent visit, I opted for the carne adovada and eggs ($10.50)—two eggs over easy, home fries, a big ol’ serving of just-right carne adovada and a warm flour tortilla. The carne was perfectly braised and soupy. It joined forces with the runny egg yolks and those potatoes were quickly surrounded. I came in with a torn-off piece of tortilla, but they never stood a chance. -EL
Green chile chicken burrito. 4354 Cerrillos Road, 471-5420 Breakfast lunch and dinner Monday-Saturday; Breakfast and lunch Sunday Horseman’s Haven Sharing its real estate with a gas station, the Haven is where you come to fill yourself up with some of the most delectable home-style dishes around and green chile hotter than Satan’s discharge. Take your pick from the menu, the Romeros have you covered. Be it with an incomparable chorizo breakfast ($9.25), chicken-stuffed quesadillas ($9.95), “Mucho burgers” ($6.25 and up) and an in-house specialty, the 3-D ground beef burrito ($8.95). On a recent visit, I opted for the carne adovada and eggs ($10.50)—two eggs over easy, home fries, a big ol’ serving of just-right carne adovada and a warm flour tortilla. The carne was perfectly braised and soupy. It joined forces with the runny egg yolks and those potatoes were quickly surrounded. I came in with a torn-off piece of tortilla, but they never stood a chance. -EL

/end pic-cntxt

Horseman’s Haven

Sharing its real estate with a gas station, the Haven is where you come to fill yourself up with some of the most delectable home-style dishes around and green chile hotter than Satan’s discharge. Take your pick from the menu, the Romeros have you covered. Be it with an incomparable chorizo breakfast ($9.25), chicken-stuffed quesadillas ($9.95), “Mucho burgers” ($6.25 and up) and an in-house specialty, the 3-D ground beef burrito ($8.95). On a recent visit, I opted for the carne adovada and eggs ($10.50)—two eggs over easy, home fries, a big ol’ serving of just-right carne adovada and a warm flour tortilla. The carne was perfectly braised and soupy. It joined forces with the runny egg yolks and those potatoes were quickly surrounded. I came in with a torn-off piece of tortilla, but they never stood a chance.

-EL

/end description

 Banana-wrapped island spiced mahi mahi. 2010 Cerrillos Road, 473-1269 Lunch and dinner Monday-Saturday Jambo Café African-Caribbean fusion Jambo Café has a sort of locals-only appeal, with casual décor the highlight of which are the gauze shade icicle lights that hang from the ceiling. Tasty options abound on this menu—the salmon salad ($12.95), which puts grilled salmon on a bed of baby greens and capers drizzled in semi-sweet mango vinaigrette; the veggie sandwich of artichoke hearts, roasted red peppers and chickpeas ($8.95), all of which comes tumbling out of a fluffy pita. So it took a few tries to land on the coconut curry ($12.95), which comes with chicken or tofu, and layers a tomato and coconut milk base with just enough spice to reign supreme over the sweetness of the coconut milk. Finish with a warm slice of pecan pie ($5.95), infused with Jamaican rum, an impossibly buttery filling topped with toasted pecans, and served with vanilla ice cream. -EM
Banana-wrapped island spiced mahi mahi. 2010 Cerrillos Road, 473-1269 Lunch and dinner Monday-Saturday Jambo Café African-Caribbean fusion Jambo Café has a sort of locals-only appeal, with casual décor the highlight of which are the gauze shade icicle lights that hang from the ceiling. Tasty options abound on this menu—the salmon salad ($12.95), which puts grilled salmon on a bed of baby greens and capers drizzled in semi-sweet mango vinaigrette; the veggie sandwich of artichoke hearts, roasted red peppers and chickpeas ($8.95), all of which comes tumbling out of a fluffy pita. So it took a few tries to land on the coconut curry ($12.95), which comes with chicken or tofu, and layers a tomato and coconut milk base with just enough spice to reign supreme over the sweetness of the coconut milk. Finish with a warm slice of pecan pie ($5.95), infused with Jamaican rum, an impossibly buttery filling topped with toasted pecans, and served with vanilla ice cream. -EM

/end pic-cntxt

Jambo Café

African-Caribbean fusion Jambo Café has a sort of locals-only appeal, with casual décor the highlight of which are the gauze shade icicle lights that hang from the ceiling. Tasty options abound on this menu—the salmon salad ($12.95), which puts grilled salmon on a bed of baby greens and capers drizzled in semi-sweet mango vinaigrette; the veggie sandwich of artichoke hearts, roasted red peppers and chickpeas ($8.95), all of which comes tumbling out of a fluffy pita. So it took a few tries to land on the coconut curry ($12.95), which comes with chicken or tofu, and layers a tomato and coconut milk base with just enough spice to reign supreme over the sweetness of the coconut milk. Finish with a warm slice of pecan pie ($5.95), infused with Jamaican rum, an impossibly buttery filling topped with toasted pecans, and served with vanilla ice cream.

-EM

/end description

 Bone marrow with smokey BBQ, pickled red onion, toast and parsley salad. 211 Old Santa Fe Trail, 984-7915 Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch on Sunday Luminaria The goods at this hotel are far from a horror story. Think red chile braised short rib egg rolls ($10), a Maryland jumbo lump crab cake ($10) accompanied by Granny Smith apple slaw and saffron aioli and a signature tortilla soup that’s picture perfect for a Santa Fe fall. Thanks to South Bronx-born chef Marc Quiñones, you’ll be asking for a late checkout, or at least meander on at your table, making an experience out of every bite. “What matters to me, is that I want to embrace the locals,” Quiñones told me, as my “Dirty BLT,” which includes a fried egg, got delivered. “It was all about figuring out what the locals here in Santa Fe find enjoyable, and how do I give that to them in a way that’s exciting and relevant, but still something that’s close to home from a comfort standpoint,” he continued. Mission accomplished. Now, someone please hand me a napkin. -EL
Bone marrow with smokey BBQ, pickled red onion, toast and parsley salad. 211 Old Santa Fe Trail, 984-7915 Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily; brunch on Sunday Luminaria The goods at this hotel are far from a horror story. Think red chile braised short rib egg rolls ($10), a Maryland jumbo lump crab cake ($10) accompanied by Granny Smith apple slaw and saffron aioli and a signature tortilla soup that’s picture perfect for a Santa Fe fall. Thanks to South Bronx-born chef Marc Quiñones, you’ll be asking for a late checkout, or at least meander on at your table, making an experience out of every bite. “What matters to me, is that I want to embrace the locals,” Quiñones told me, as my “Dirty BLT,” which includes a fried egg, got delivered. “It was all about figuring out what the locals here in Santa Fe find enjoyable, and how do I give that to them in a way that’s exciting and relevant, but still something that’s close to home from a comfort standpoint,” he continued. Mission accomplished. Now, someone please hand me a napkin. -EL

/end pic-cntxt

Luminaria

The goods at this hotel are far from a horror story. Think red chile braised short rib egg rolls ($10), a Maryland jumbo lump crab cake ($10) accompanied by Granny Smith apple slaw and saffron aioli and a signature tortilla soup that’s picture perfect for a Santa Fe fall. Thanks to South Bronx-born chef Marc Quiñones, you’ll be asking for a late checkout, or at least meander on at your table, making an experience out of every bite. “What matters to me, is that I want to embrace the locals,” Quiñones told me, as my “Dirty BLT,” which includes a fried egg, got delivered. “It was all about figuring out what the locals here in Santa Fe find enjoyable, and how do I give that to them in a way that’s exciting and relevant, but still something that’s close to home from a comfort standpoint,” he continued. Mission accomplished. Now, someone please hand me a napkin.

-EL

/end description

 Kale and mung sprout salad with fresh kale and sprouted mung beans tossed in a bright lemon vinaigrette topped with pomegranate seeds, mango lassi. 551 W Cordova Road, 930-5521 Dinner Tuesday-Sunday Paper Dosa Indian food doesn’t have to be a pile of indistinguishable mush, and the whole concept of assembling your own dosa proves that it can also be fun as an evening of DIY if you go to the right restaurant. Located just a door down from Maria’s, Paper Dosa couldn’t be a more opposite approach to City Different dining. Order a dosa, of course, and be treated to a paper-thin, Indian-style crepe that’s so big there’s no way it fits on the plate. Can’t choose? Try the traditional masala, potatoes blended with turmeric, caramelized onions, red chile, mustard seeds and cashews ($10). Each comes with two housemade chutneys, a mint-green coconut concoction and a tomato basil rendition, along with a cup of spicy lentil soup. A definite don’t-miss on the menu is the onion pakora, fried onions and jalapeños served with an eggplant sauce ($8). And as you’re wondering whether you’ll need one or two Tums on the way home, calm down your gut with Rasmalai ($5), a fresh cheese dessert drenched in sweet cream with rosewater and cardamom. Nom. -JAG
Kale and mung sprout salad with fresh kale and sprouted mung beans tossed in a bright lemon vinaigrette topped with pomegranate seeds, mango lassi. 551 W Cordova Road, 930-5521 Dinner Tuesday-Sunday Paper Dosa Indian food doesn’t have to be a pile of indistinguishable mush, and the whole concept of assembling your own dosa proves that it can also be fun as an evening of DIY if you go to the right restaurant. Located just a door down from Maria’s, Paper Dosa couldn’t be a more opposite approach to City Different dining. Order a dosa, of course, and be treated to a paper-thin, Indian-style crepe that’s so big there’s no way it fits on the plate. Can’t choose? Try the traditional masala, potatoes blended with turmeric, caramelized onions, red chile, mustard seeds and cashews ($10). Each comes with two housemade chutneys, a mint-green coconut concoction and a tomato basil rendition, along with a cup of spicy lentil soup. A definite don’t-miss on the menu is the onion pakora, fried onions and jalapeños served with an eggplant sauce ($8). And as you’re wondering whether you’ll need one or two Tums on the way home, calm down your gut with Rasmalai ($5), a fresh cheese dessert drenched in sweet cream with rosewater and cardamom. Nom. -JAG

/end pic-cntxt

Paper Dosa

Indian food doesn’t have to be a pile of indistinguishable mush, and the whole concept of assembling your own dosa proves that it can also be fun as an evening of DIY if you go to the right restaurant. Located just a door down from Maria’s, Paper Dosa couldn’t be a more opposite approach to City Different dining. Order a dosa, of course, and be treated to a paper-thin, Indian-style crepe that’s so big there’s no way it fits on the plate. Can’t choose? Try the traditional masala, potatoes blended with turmeric, caramelized onions, red chile, mustard seeds and cashews ($10). Each comes with two housemade chutneys, a mint-green coconut concoction and a tomato basil rendition, along with a cup of spicy lentil soup. A definite don’t-miss on the menu is the onion pakora, fried onions and jalapeños served with an eggplant sauce ($8). And as you’re wondering whether you’ll need one or two Tums on the way home, calm down your gut with Rasmalai ($5), a fresh cheese dessert drenched in sweet cream with rosewater and cardamom. Nom.

-JAG

/end description

 Carne Guisada and chicken burritos. 1833 Cerillos Road, 995-8015 Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily El Parasol Those seeking casual and authentic New Mexican should check out El Parasol and their seemingly never-ending supply of goods. It’s like Willy Wonka’s chocolate factory, if said chocolate house specialized in shredded beef tacos and tortilla burgers, and had an awkward drive-thru window (note: it’s for pick-up only). A recent visit consisted of calling ahead (he can be taught!) and picking up a sack filled with calabacitas burritos ($5.50 each) and some of the best chicken tamales in town ($2.60 a pop). Combo plates are also available, as are non-NM treats like foot-long hot dogs and their handmade tortilla chips. Hosting a party? All of their items are available in bulk too. It’s not just the chile that can make it feel like year-round Christmas here, even though they’re not known for ’em, the airy handmade biscochitos ($2.25 for a package of three or $8.50 for a dozen), are sure to transform any hackneyed day into a special occasion. -EL
Carne Guisada and chicken burritos. 1833 Cerillos Road, 995-8015 Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily El Parasol Those seeking casual and authentic New Mexican should check out El Parasol and their seemingly never-ending supply of goods. It’s like Willy Wonka’s chocolate factory, if said chocolate house specialized in shredded beef tacos and tortilla burgers, and had an awkward drive-thru window (note: it’s for pick-up only). A recent visit consisted of calling ahead (he can be taught!) and picking up a sack filled with calabacitas burritos ($5.50 each) and some of the best chicken tamales in town ($2.60 a pop). Combo plates are also available, as are non-NM treats like foot-long hot dogs and their handmade tortilla chips. Hosting a party? All of their items are available in bulk too. It’s not just the chile that can make it feel like year-round Christmas here, even though they’re not known for ’em, the airy handmade biscochitos ($2.25 for a package of three or $8.50 for a dozen), are sure to transform any hackneyed day into a special occasion. -EL

/end pic-cntxt

El Parasol

Those seeking casual and authentic New Mexican should check out El Parasol and their seemingly never-ending supply of goods. It’s like Willy Wonka’s chocolate factory, if said chocolate house specialized in shredded beef tacos and tortilla burgers, and had an awkward drive-thru window (note: it’s for pick-up only). A recent visit consisted of calling ahead (he can be taught!) and picking up a sack filled with calabacitas burritos ($5.50 each) and some of the best chicken tamales in town ($2.60 a pop). Combo plates are also available, as are non-NM treats like foot-long hot dogs and their handmade tortilla chips. Hosting a party? All of their items are available in bulk too. It’s not just the chile that can make it feel like year-round Christmas here, even though they’re not known for ’em, the airy handmade biscochitos ($2.25 for a package of three or $8.50 for a dozen), are sure to transform any hackneyed day into a special occasion.

-EL

/end description

 Quattro Stagioni. 204 N Guadalupe St., 982-8474 Dinner daily Pizzeria da Lino At Pizzeria da Lino, the owner cut a hole in the roof to drop an Italian oven into the mix a few years ago. So it’s not surprising that the pizza tastes like it just came from Napoli, the inventor of the pizza. Try Quattro Stagioni ($13), a pizza for Four Seasons. It’s got artichokes on one quarter, ham on the second, mushrooms on the third and olives completing the pie. It’s probably one of the quickest baking pizzas in town, arriving within 7 minutes of my order. And it’s paper thin, not too heavy for those who are watching their waists. Maybe all Italians are thin because of their pizza, not the Mediterranean diet. That’s food for thought, for the dough is barely noticeable, unlike some other joints in town. As a complement, try the Caesar salad ($9.50). The lettuce was fresh and perfectly chilled, always the cornerstone to a delicious salad, the dressing excepted. The Caprese salad ($11) was also a carbon copy of the home country, with the mozzarella cheese and tomatoes and basil, seasoned with salt and olive oil. -TR
Quattro Stagioni. 204 N Guadalupe St., 982-8474 Dinner daily Pizzeria da Lino At Pizzeria da Lino, the owner cut a hole in the roof to drop an Italian oven into the mix a few years ago. So it’s not surprising that the pizza tastes like it just came from Napoli, the inventor of the pizza. Try Quattro Stagioni ($13), a pizza for Four Seasons. It’s got artichokes on one quarter, ham on the second, mushrooms on the third and olives completing the pie. It’s probably one of the quickest baking pizzas in town, arriving within 7 minutes of my order. And it’s paper thin, not too heavy for those who are watching their waists. Maybe all Italians are thin because of their pizza, not the Mediterranean diet. That’s food for thought, for the dough is barely noticeable, unlike some other joints in town. As a complement, try the Caesar salad ($9.50). The lettuce was fresh and perfectly chilled, always the cornerstone to a delicious salad, the dressing excepted. The Caprese salad ($11) was also a carbon copy of the home country, with the mozzarella cheese and tomatoes and basil, seasoned with salt and olive oil. -TR

/end pic-cntxt

Pizzeria da Lino

At Pizzeria da Lino, the owner cut a hole in the roof to drop an Italian oven into the mix a few years ago. So it’s not surprising that the pizza tastes like it just came from Napoli, the inventor of the pizza. Try Quattro Stagioni ($13), a pizza for Four Seasons. It’s got artichokes on one quarter, ham on the second, mushrooms on the third and olives completing the pie. It’s probably one of the quickest baking pizzas in town, arriving within 7 minutes of my order. And it’s paper thin, not too heavy for those who are watching their waists. Maybe all Italians are thin because of their pizza, not the Mediterranean diet. That’s food for thought, for the dough is barely noticeable, unlike some other joints in town. As a complement, try the Caesar salad ($9.50). The lettuce was fresh and perfectly chilled, always the cornerstone to a delicious salad, the dressing excepted. The Caprese salad ($11) was also a carbon copy of the home country, with the mozzarella cheese and tomatoes and basil, seasoned with salt and olive oil.

-TR

/end description

 Puma Huynh with mi xao tom (egg noodle with shrimp) and cha gio (egg roll). 919 W Alameda St., 820-6777 Lunch and dinner daily Pho Kim Just try eating pho without giggling at least once. Whether it’s attempting to tame those long rice noodles into a single bite, picking up a hunk of thinly sliced tender beef with chopsticks or slurping the broth from the giant bowl instead of the duck spoon, this Vietnamese dish is tasty and entertaining. While Pho Kim also serves a list of curries and other kinds of soup too long to mention, its versions of the popular Southeast Asian regional cuisine are worth trying. Especially remarkable is the vegetarian effort, Pho Chay ($7.99); a flavorful veggie broth base includes bok choi, broccoli, onions and a selection of soy-based “imitation meats” that are way better than that name suggests. A milder flavor with hints of sweetness accompanies the rare steak version called Pho Tai ($8.29). All pho comes with a plate of extras such as fresh basil and cilantro, bean sprouts and jalapeño. You should also dress it up with the selection of basic sauces that sit on the table. -JAG
Puma Huynh with mi xao tom (egg noodle with shrimp) and cha gio (egg roll). 919 W Alameda St., 820-6777 Lunch and dinner daily Pho Kim Just try eating pho without giggling at least once. Whether it’s attempting to tame those long rice noodles into a single bite, picking up a hunk of thinly sliced tender beef with chopsticks or slurping the broth from the giant bowl instead of the duck spoon, this Vietnamese dish is tasty and entertaining. While Pho Kim also serves a list of curries and other kinds of soup too long to mention, its versions of the popular Southeast Asian regional cuisine are worth trying. Especially remarkable is the vegetarian effort, Pho Chay ($7.99); a flavorful veggie broth base includes bok choi, broccoli, onions and a selection of soy-based “imitation meats” that are way better than that name suggests. A milder flavor with hints of sweetness accompanies the rare steak version called Pho Tai ($8.29). All pho comes with a plate of extras such as fresh basil and cilantro, bean sprouts and jalapeño. You should also dress it up with the selection of basic sauces that sit on the table. -JAG

/end pic-cntxt

Pho Kim

Just try eating pho without giggling at least once. Whether it’s attempting to tame those long rice noodles into a single bite, picking up a hunk of thinly sliced tender beef with chopsticks or slurping the broth from the giant bowl instead of the duck spoon, this Vietnamese dish is tasty and entertaining. While Pho Kim also serves a list of curries and other kinds of soup too long to mention, its versions of the popular Southeast Asian regional cuisine are worth trying. Especially remarkable is the vegetarian effort, Pho Chay ($7.99); a flavorful veggie broth base includes bok choi, broccoli, onions and a selection of soy-based “imitation meats” that are way better than that name suggests. A milder flavor with hints of sweetness accompanies the rare steak version called Pho Tai ($8.29). All pho comes with a plate of extras such as fresh basil and cilantro, bean sprouts and jalapeño. You should also dress it up with the selection of basic sauces that sit on the table.

-JAG

/end description

 Watermelon with ancho vinaigrette, cotija and crispy pig ear. 548 Agua Fría St., 930-5325 Serving dinner Tuesday-Sunday Radish & Rye It is unclear if chef David Gaspar de Alba used an online hipster name generator to come up with the business’ moniker, but one thing is for sure: The farm-inspired restaurant/whiskey bar is a welcome addition to Santa Fe’s foodscape, one that flies above trends and makes good on its mission’s promise to be a tangible “expression of our values, creativity and love of this community.” The love is evident in starters like the ham hock croquettes served with pickled shallots and grain mustard ($8) and the oh-so-delectable sea scallop ceviche ($14), which’ll have you coming back for more. Ingredients are locally mined, so ask ahead about seasonal specials. If they happen to have the grilled pork chop ($34) served on a bed of polenta and topped with smoked pork belly, man, are you in luck. It gets better with every bite, and it’ll make you curse your parents’ names for having convinced you during your formative years that pork chops were that prepackaged Hormel slop. I still love you, Mom. -EL
Watermelon with ancho vinaigrette, cotija and crispy pig ear. 548 Agua Fría St., 930-5325 Serving dinner Tuesday-Sunday Radish & Rye It is unclear if chef David Gaspar de Alba used an online hipster name generator to come up with the business’ moniker, but one thing is for sure: The farm-inspired restaurant/whiskey bar is a welcome addition to Santa Fe’s foodscape, one that flies above trends and makes good on its mission’s promise to be a tangible “expression of our values, creativity and love of this community.” The love is evident in starters like the ham hock croquettes served with pickled shallots and grain mustard ($8) and the oh-so-delectable sea scallop ceviche ($14), which’ll have you coming back for more. Ingredients are locally mined, so ask ahead about seasonal specials. If they happen to have the grilled pork chop ($34) served on a bed of polenta and topped with smoked pork belly, man, are you in luck. It gets better with every bite, and it’ll make you curse your parents’ names for having convinced you during your formative years that pork chops were that prepackaged Hormel slop. I still love you, Mom. -EL

/end pic-cntxt

Radish & Rye

It is unclear if chef David Gaspar de Alba used an online hipster name generator to come up with the business’ moniker, but one thing is for sure: The farm-inspired restaurant/whiskey bar is a welcome addition to Santa Fe’s foodscape, one that flies above trends and makes good on its mission’s promise to be a tangible “expression of our values, creativity and love of this community.” The love is evident in starters like the ham hock croquettes served with pickled shallots and grain mustard ($8) and the oh-so-delectable sea scallop ceviche ($14), which’ll have you coming back for more. Ingredients are locally mined, so ask ahead about seasonal specials. If they happen to have the grilled pork chop ($34) served on a bed of polenta and topped with smoked pork belly, man, are you in luck. It gets better with every bite, and it’ll make you curse your parents’ names for having convinced you during your formative years that pork chops were that prepackaged Hormel slop. I still love you, Mom.

-EL

/end description

 Turkey melt with strawberry shake. 3466 Zafarano Drive, 424-0755 Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily Plaza Café Southside While the Plaza Café downtown may recall the City Different’s Greek roots, its Southside compatriot feels more firmly planted in the charms of another era—a chrome-plated, neon-lit, milk-shaking era. The Plaza Café Southside fuels indulgences in the classic pleasures of a hamburger and French fries ($11.95) or 8-ounce grass-fed rib-eye steak and cheese enchiladas ($21). Wander off the beaten (and beef-driven) track to try the crispy avocado tacos ($12.95), avocado encrusted with crunchy quinoa, sesame and poppy seeds topped with a colorful splash of pickled onion, cilantro, corn and red pepper and accompanied by a trio of salsas, the smoky red salsa matching particularly well. Round your meal out with a slice of caramel apple pie ($6.45), or get a little adventurous and go for the red velvet flan ($6.45), a dense layer of red velvet cake with creamy flan on top, a melt-in-your-mouth, expletive-inducing combination. Enjoy it all inside, amid the vinyl and chrome, or take it outside onto a pleasantly shaded patio on the San Isidro Plaza, facing the Regal Stadium 14. -EM
Turkey melt with strawberry shake. 3466 Zafarano Drive, 424-0755 Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily Plaza Café Southside While the Plaza Café downtown may recall the City Different’s Greek roots, its Southside compatriot feels more firmly planted in the charms of another era—a chrome-plated, neon-lit, milk-shaking era. The Plaza Café Southside fuels indulgences in the classic pleasures of a hamburger and French fries ($11.95) or 8-ounce grass-fed rib-eye steak and cheese enchiladas ($21). Wander off the beaten (and beef-driven) track to try the crispy avocado tacos ($12.95), avocado encrusted with crunchy quinoa, sesame and poppy seeds topped with a colorful splash of pickled onion, cilantro, corn and red pepper and accompanied by a trio of salsas, the smoky red salsa matching particularly well. Round your meal out with a slice of caramel apple pie ($6.45), or get a little adventurous and go for the red velvet flan ($6.45), a dense layer of red velvet cake with creamy flan on top, a melt-in-your-mouth, expletive-inducing combination. Enjoy it all inside, amid the vinyl and chrome, or take it outside onto a pleasantly shaded patio on the San Isidro Plaza, facing the Regal Stadium 14. -EM

/end pic-cntxt

Plaza Café Southside

While the Plaza Café downtown may recall the City Different’s Greek roots, its Southside compatriot feels more firmly planted in the charms of another era—a chrome-plated, neon-lit, milk-shaking era. The Plaza Café Southside fuels indulgences in the classic pleasures of a hamburger and French fries ($11.95) or 8-ounce grass-fed rib-eye steak and cheese enchiladas ($21). Wander off the beaten (and beef-driven) track to try the crispy avocado tacos ($12.95), avocado encrusted with crunchy quinoa, sesame and poppy seeds topped with a colorful splash of pickled onion, cilantro, corn and red pepper and accompanied by a trio of salsas, the smoky red salsa matching particularly well. Round your meal out with a slice of caramel apple pie ($6.45), or get a little adventurous and go for the red velvet flan ($6.45), a dense layer of red velvet cake with creamy flan on top, a melt-in-your-mouth, expletive-inducing combination. Enjoy it all inside, amid the vinyl and chrome, or take it outside onto a pleasantly shaded patio on the San Isidro Plaza, facing the Regal Stadium 14.

-EM

/end description

 Red chile honey-glazed half rack baby back ribs with green chile slaw, green chile cornbread and waffle fries. 2571 Calle Cristo’s, 424-8900 Dinner daily The Ranch House From baby back ribs to tender pulled pork and back around to beef brisket, the husband-and-wife team of Josh Baum and Ann Gordon (who formerly dreamed up Josh’s BBQ) brings a spacious and tasty dining experience to the Southside. If you’re looking for dramatic, off-the-wall flavor combos, keep looking. But if it’s no-frills, satisfying cooking that you seek, and especially if you are meeting the whole office management team or the extended family, this is it. Red chile in a honey glaze for the rack of ribs gives this standard the sweet crust to hold all the fatty, moist, smoky goodness in close to the bones ($27.95 for the full rack, $16.95 for half). Served with a fresh piece of cornbread and your choice of two sides, including fresh calabacitas with no chile, the plate is a pleasing one. Get a quarter rack for lunch ($11.95) at a price that keeps your wallet full of fatback. -JAG
Red chile honey-glazed half rack baby back ribs with green chile slaw, green chile cornbread and waffle fries. 2571 Calle Cristo’s, 424-8900 Dinner daily The Ranch House From baby back ribs to tender pulled pork and back around to beef brisket, the husband-and-wife team of Josh Baum and Ann Gordon (who formerly dreamed up Josh’s BBQ) brings a spacious and tasty dining experience to the Southside. If you’re looking for dramatic, off-the-wall flavor combos, keep looking. But if it’s no-frills, satisfying cooking that you seek, and especially if you are meeting the whole office management team or the extended family, this is it. Red chile in a honey glaze for the rack of ribs gives this standard the sweet crust to hold all the fatty, moist, smoky goodness in close to the bones ($27.95 for the full rack, $16.95 for half). Served with a fresh piece of cornbread and your choice of two sides, including fresh calabacitas with no chile, the plate is a pleasing one. Get a quarter rack for lunch ($11.95) at a price that keeps your wallet full of fatback. -JAG

/end pic-cntxt

The Ranch House

From baby back ribs to tender pulled pork and back around to beef brisket, the husband-and-wife team of Josh Baum and Ann Gordon (who formerly dreamed up Josh’s BBQ) brings a spacious and tasty dining experience to the Southside. If you’re looking for dramatic, off-the-wall flavor combos, keep looking. But if it’s no-frills, satisfying cooking that you seek, and especially if you are meeting the whole office management team or the extended family, this is it. Red chile in a honey glaze for the rack of ribs gives this standard the sweet crust to hold all the fatty, moist, smoky goodness in close to the bones ($27.95 for the full rack, $16.95 for half). Served with a fresh piece of cornbread and your choice of two sides, including fresh calabacitas with no chile, the plate is a pleasing one. Get a quarter rack for lunch ($11.95) at a price that keeps your wallet full of fatback.

-JAG

/end description

 Tostada combo. 1310 Osage Ave., 820-6552 Open for three meals a day stating at 8 am Red Enchilada Touting Mexican, New Mexican and Central American-inspired dishes, Red Enchilada is a hidden gem that, thanks to consistency in product and service, is finally getting the attention it deserves. One visit here wasn’t enough to review; gladly I come here once a week and was able to write-off a few meals. Downhome nirvana here is achieved thanks to dishes like the hearty steak and eggs ($8.95), which comes accompanied by sautéed potatoes, and a personal fave: the simple yet effective American breakfast clocking in at $6.95 (two eggs, choice of bacon or ham, potatoes, refried beans and chile Caribe on the side). Of note are also the plantain-wrapped chicken or pork tamales ($2.75 apiece) that, along with the colorful murals that call the Red Enchilada home, will transport you straight to the Costa Rican coast. ¡Pura vida! -EL
Tostada combo. 1310 Osage Ave., 820-6552 Open for three meals a day stating at 8 am Red Enchilada Touting Mexican, New Mexican and Central American-inspired dishes, Red Enchilada is a hidden gem that, thanks to consistency in product and service, is finally getting the attention it deserves. One visit here wasn’t enough to review; gladly I come here once a week and was able to write-off a few meals. Downhome nirvana here is achieved thanks to dishes like the hearty steak and eggs ($8.95), which comes accompanied by sautéed potatoes, and a personal fave: the simple yet effective American breakfast clocking in at $6.95 (two eggs, choice of bacon or ham, potatoes, refried beans and chile Caribe on the side). Of note are also the plantain-wrapped chicken or pork tamales ($2.75 apiece) that, along with the colorful murals that call the Red Enchilada home, will transport you straight to the Costa Rican coast. ¡Pura vida! -EL

/end pic-cntxt

Red Enchilada

Touting Mexican, New Mexican and Central American-inspired dishes, Red Enchilada is a hidden gem that, thanks to consistency in product and service, is finally getting the attention it deserves. One visit here wasn’t enough to review; gladly I come here once a week and was able to write-off a few meals. Downhome nirvana here is achieved thanks to dishes like the hearty steak and eggs ($8.95), which comes accompanied by sautéed potatoes, and a personal fave: the simple yet effective American breakfast clocking in at $6.95 (two eggs, choice of bacon or ham, potatoes, refried beans and chile Caribe on the side). Of note are also the plantain-wrapped chicken or pork tamales ($2.75 apiece) that, along with the colorful murals that call the Red Enchilada home, will transport you straight to the Costa Rican coast. ¡Pura vida!

-EL

/end description

 Spicy tuna (in Champagne flute), salmon, abalone. 321 Johnson St., 982-9708 Lunch Monday-Friday; dinner Monday-Saturday Shohko Café East meets Southwest at Shohko, where delectable Japanese cuisine is infused by a dose of, what else, green chile. Spot it on the tempura menu, which allows for an assortment or a single option from a list that includes, of course, green chile, as well as asparagus, watercress and oyster mushrooms ($5). Our familiar friend again appears in the ramen listings, as a topping alongside jalapeños, corn and mild or hot chile sauces to add to housemade broth and ramen noodles with pork, fish cake, bamboo, green onions and egg ($11). And, of course, the Santa Fe sushi rolls ($7) bring together tempura green chile, tempura shrimp and avocado for a spice that’ll see you setting the wasabi aside to simply enjoy. If you’re in the mood for classics, start somewhere closer to the seaweed salad ($5), steer toward the nigiri menu for yellowtail atop sushi rice ($6) and land in handrolls and sliced rolls that call forward classics like the California roll ($6), spicy tuna roll ($8) and even volcano roll ($16), which tops the above with spicy mayo and spends a little time baking before being dropped in front of your chopsticks. -EM
Spicy tuna (in Champagne flute), salmon, abalone. 321 Johnson St., 982-9708 Lunch Monday-Friday; dinner Monday-Saturday Shohko Café East meets Southwest at Shohko, where delectable Japanese cuisine is infused by a dose of, what else, green chile. Spot it on the tempura menu, which allows for an assortment or a single option from a list that includes, of course, green chile, as well as asparagus, watercress and oyster mushrooms ($5). Our familiar friend again appears in the ramen listings, as a topping alongside jalapeños, corn and mild or hot chile sauces to add to housemade broth and ramen noodles with pork, fish cake, bamboo, green onions and egg ($11). And, of course, the Santa Fe sushi rolls ($7) bring together tempura green chile, tempura shrimp and avocado for a spice that’ll see you setting the wasabi aside to simply enjoy. If you’re in the mood for classics, start somewhere closer to the seaweed salad ($5), steer toward the nigiri menu for yellowtail atop sushi rice ($6) and land in handrolls and sliced rolls that call forward classics like the California roll ($6), spicy tuna roll ($8) and even volcano roll ($16), which tops the above with spicy mayo and spends a little time baking before being dropped in front of your chopsticks. -EM

/end pic-cntxt

Shohko Café

East meets Southwest at Shohko, where delectable Japanese cuisine is infused by a dose of, what else, green chile. Spot it on the tempura menu, which allows for an assortment or a single option from a list that includes, of course, green chile, as well as asparagus, watercress and oyster mushrooms ($5). Our familiar friend again appears in the ramen listings, as a topping alongside jalapeños, corn and mild or hot chile sauces to add to housemade broth and ramen noodles with pork, fish cake, bamboo, green onions and egg ($11). And, of course, the Santa Fe sushi rolls ($7) bring together tempura green chile, tempura shrimp and avocado for a spice that’ll see you setting the wasabi aside to simply enjoy. If you’re in the mood for classics, start somewhere closer to the seaweed salad ($5), steer toward the nigiri menu for yellowtail atop sushi rice ($6) and land in handrolls and sliced rolls that call forward classics like the California roll ($6), spicy tuna roll ($8) and even volcano roll ($16), which tops the above with spicy mayo and spends a little time baking before being dropped in front of your chopsticks.

-EM

/end description

 Halibut en salsa de mole amarillo, with pan-seared halibut, sautéed oyster mushrooms, green beans, mango-yellow bell pepper and white chocolate mole. 125 Lincoln Ave., Ste. 117, 988-7102 Lunch and dinner daily Taberna Remember the last three times that you tried octopus? Forget them. Among the small plates at one of Santa Fe’s original tapas joints is pulpo, braised octopus carpaccio with lemon juice, pimentón and olive oil ($13). The thin slices of fish get rid of the rubber-band memories and replace them with, “Oh yeah, we ate that.” Dependably terrific alcachofas, the artichokes wrapped in grilled jamón serrano with basil piñón pesto and goat cheese are all you really need in a vegetable ($15). Then, when your visit moves more in the dinner direction, we recommend the pair of tortita sliders made from braised short ribs with a sweet and tangy guava barbecue sauce and cabbage slaw ($12) and the tacos de robalo, generous helpings of fried barramundi with serrano peppers and all the fixings. On the side is a fire-hot habanero peanut sauce that will make your fancy port taste even more rich and decadent. Hit up this restaurant’s outdoor seating, equipped with pole-mounted heaters to take maximum advantage of the bricked-in courtyard every season. -JAG
Halibut en salsa de mole amarillo, with pan-seared halibut, sautéed oyster mushrooms, green beans, mango-yellow bell pepper and white chocolate mole. 125 Lincoln Ave., Ste. 117, 988-7102 Lunch and dinner daily Taberna Remember the last three times that you tried octopus? Forget them. Among the small plates at one of Santa Fe’s original tapas joints is pulpo, braised octopus carpaccio with lemon juice, pimentón and olive oil ($13). The thin slices of fish get rid of the rubber-band memories and replace them with, “Oh yeah, we ate that.” Dependably terrific alcachofas, the artichokes wrapped in grilled jamón serrano with basil piñón pesto and goat cheese are all you really need in a vegetable ($15). Then, when your visit moves more in the dinner direction, we recommend the pair of tortita sliders made from braised short ribs with a sweet and tangy guava barbecue sauce and cabbage slaw ($12) and the tacos de robalo, generous helpings of fried barramundi with serrano peppers and all the fixings. On the side is a fire-hot habanero peanut sauce that will make your fancy port taste even more rich and decadent. Hit up this restaurant’s outdoor seating, equipped with pole-mounted heaters to take maximum advantage of the bricked-in courtyard every season. -JAG

/end pic-cntxt

Taberna

Remember the last three times that you tried octopus? Forget them. Among the small plates at one of Santa Fe’s original tapas joints is pulpo, braised octopus carpaccio with lemon juice, pimentón and olive oil ($13). The thin slices of fish get rid of the rubber-band memories and replace them with, “Oh yeah, we ate that.” Dependably terrific alcachofas, the artichokes wrapped in grilled jamón serrano with basil piñón pesto and goat cheese are all you really need in a vegetable ($15). Then, when your visit moves more in the dinner direction, we recommend the pair of tortita sliders made from braised short ribs with a sweet and tangy guava barbecue sauce and cabbage slaw ($12) and the tacos de robalo, generous helpings of fried barramundi with serrano peppers and all the fixings. On the side is a fire-hot habanero peanut sauce that will make your fancy port taste even more rich and decadent. Hit up this restaurant’s outdoor seating, equipped with pole-mounted heaters to take maximum advantage of the bricked-in courtyard every season.

-JAG

/end description

 Eggs Florentine with classic poached eggs, sautéed spinach, English muffin and hollandaise. 1616 St. Michael’s Drive, 988-1362 Breakfast and lunch Tuesday-Sunday Tecolote Many worried for Tecolote Café’s fate when the venerable eatery was ousted from its Cerrillos Road location, and kept a candle lit for the return of Katie and Matt Adkins’ Midas breakfast touch. Would the atole piñón pancakes be as fluffy? And what about the endless owl-themed tchotchkes? Would they survive the move? The answer to all is a qualified yes. Now situated along St. Michael’s Drive, and boasting both expanded kitchens and dining rooms, it’s clear not just that Tecolote is back, but that thankfully it’s here to stay. Order from “Bill’s Favorite’s”—a nod to Katie’s father and the eatery’s original owner—and be blown away. The carne adovada burrito ($11.95), stuffed with lean pork that’s cooked in a barrel of red chiles, is mind blowing. As are the huevos Yucatecos ($11.25), two eggs any style crowned with feta and pico de gallo and surrounded by fried bananas. Eggs Benny here ($10.75) are also standouts. They come drenched in so much Hollandaise, the plates are thinking about writing the Adkinses a Dear John letter. And then there’s the bread baskets, the wonders of which cannot be contained by my limited word count. -EL
Eggs Florentine with classic poached eggs, sautéed spinach, English muffin and hollandaise. 1616 St. Michael’s Drive, 988-1362 Breakfast and lunch Tuesday-Sunday Tecolote Many worried for Tecolote Café’s fate when the venerable eatery was ousted from its Cerrillos Road location, and kept a candle lit for the return of Katie and Matt Adkins’ Midas breakfast touch. Would the atole piñón pancakes be as fluffy? And what about the endless owl-themed tchotchkes? Would they survive the move? The answer to all is a qualified yes. Now situated along St. Michael’s Drive, and boasting both expanded kitchens and dining rooms, it’s clear not just that Tecolote is back, but that thankfully it’s here to stay. Order from “Bill’s Favorite’s”—a nod to Katie’s father and the eatery’s original owner—and be blown away. The carne adovada burrito ($11.95), stuffed with lean pork that’s cooked in a barrel of red chiles, is mind blowing. As are the huevos Yucatecos ($11.25), two eggs any style crowned with feta and pico de gallo and surrounded by fried bananas. Eggs Benny here ($10.75) are also standouts. They come drenched in so much Hollandaise, the plates are thinking about writing the Adkinses a Dear John letter. And then there’s the bread baskets, the wonders of which cannot be contained by my limited word count. -EL

/end pic-cntxt

Tecolote

Many worried for Tecolote Café’s fate when the venerable eatery was ousted from its Cerrillos Road location, and kept a candle lit for the return of Katie and Matt Adkins’ Midas breakfast touch. Would the atole piñón pancakes be as fluffy? And what about the endless owl-themed tchotchkes? Would they survive the move? The answer to all is a qualified yes. Now situated along St. Michael’s Drive, and boasting both expanded kitchens and dining rooms, it’s clear not just that Tecolote is back, but that thankfully it’s here to stay. Order from “Bill’s Favorite’s”—a nod to Katie’s father and the eatery’s original owner—and be blown away. The carne adovada burrito ($11.95), stuffed with lean pork that’s cooked in a barrel of red chiles, is mind blowing. As are the huevos Yucatecos ($11.25), two eggs any style crowned with feta and pico de gallo and surrounded by fried bananas. Eggs Benny here ($10.75) are also standouts. They come drenched in so much Hollandaise, the plates are thinking about writing the Adkinses a Dear John letter. And then there’s the bread baskets, the wonders of which cannot be contained by my limited word count.

-EL

/end description

 Corned beef hash with housemade corned beef, two poached eggs and toast. 1115 Hickox St., 983-7060 Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily Tune-Up Café If you want take a date out for a decent meal and appear local at the same time, try the Tune-Up Cafe. It’s a neighborhood bar whose range in cuisine is hard to exactly define but definitely Latino at its core. Is it a Mexican bistro? Is it an Italian eatery? Charlotte Rivera says she’d prefer not to pigeonhole and adds that everything is awesome. For sure, a few of the courses are funky sounding, like the “Eggs in hell” ($10.95), a pair of poached eggs in homemade pomodoro sauce with crushed red peppers, spinach, Parmesan cheese, hash browns and ciabatta toast (crusty on the outside and soft on the inside). Or try the lamb barbacoa tacos ($11.95). They’ve got to be the best corn-tortilla tacos in town with cotija cheese, spinach, radish, onion, cilantro, refried beans, Spanish rice and árbol tomatillo sauce. The fresh squeezed cantaloupe and/or watermelon ($2) are also a nutritious alternative to orange juice. And it’s spooned out of a big container that makes you feel like you’re south of the border. -TR
Corned beef hash with housemade corned beef, two poached eggs and toast. 1115 Hickox St., 983-7060 Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily Tune-Up Café If you want take a date out for a decent meal and appear local at the same time, try the Tune-Up Cafe. It’s a neighborhood bar whose range in cuisine is hard to exactly define but definitely Latino at its core. Is it a Mexican bistro? Is it an Italian eatery? Charlotte Rivera says she’d prefer not to pigeonhole and adds that everything is awesome. For sure, a few of the courses are funky sounding, like the “Eggs in hell” ($10.95), a pair of poached eggs in homemade pomodoro sauce with crushed red peppers, spinach, Parmesan cheese, hash browns and ciabatta toast (crusty on the outside and soft on the inside). Or try the lamb barbacoa tacos ($11.95). They’ve got to be the best corn-tortilla tacos in town with cotija cheese, spinach, radish, onion, cilantro, refried beans, Spanish rice and árbol tomatillo sauce. The fresh squeezed cantaloupe and/or watermelon ($2) are also a nutritious alternative to orange juice. And it’s spooned out of a big container that makes you feel like you’re south of the border. -TR

/end pic-cntxt

Tune-Up Café

If you want take a date out for a decent meal and appear local at the same time, try the Tune-Up Cafe. It’s a neighborhood bar whose range in cuisine is hard to exactly define but definitely Latino at its core. Is it a Mexican bistro? Is it an Italian eatery? Charlotte Rivera says she’d prefer not to pigeonhole and adds that everything is awesome. For sure, a few of the courses are funky sounding, like the “Eggs in hell” ($10.95), a pair of poached eggs in homemade pomodoro sauce with crushed red peppers, spinach, Parmesan cheese, hash browns and ciabatta toast (crusty on the outside and soft on the inside). Or try the lamb barbacoa tacos ($11.95). They’ve got to be the best corn-tortilla tacos in town with cotija cheese, spinach, radish, onion, cilantro, refried beans, Spanish rice and árbol tomatillo sauce. The fresh squeezed cantaloupe and/or watermelon ($2) are also a nutritious alternative to orange juice. And it’s spooned out of a big container that makes you feel like you’re south of the border.

-TR

/end description

 Left: Whoo’s baker Anders Linquist; right: Ryan Lampro. 851 Cerrillos Road, Ste. B, 629-1678 Open daily 7 am-till they run out Whoo’s Donuts Few things can liven up a desolate newsroom quite like a box filled with donuts. Glazed, dusted and stuffed with creamy filling, they remind us crotchety journos of simpler times. Times that didn’t include deadlines, stretch-waisted pants or us having to worry about escalating blood sugar. Broaching the finish line for this guide, I decided to channel my munificent side and show up to HQ like a black-bearded Santa, my sleigh guided by the incomparable treats of Whoo’s. Needless to say they were a hit. I had to fend off a coworker with a letter opener for the dark chocolate crunch one. The red chile bacon one was solid, the orange cardamom heavenly, the cherry coconut one blissful, the blue corn blueberry lavender—help me out here, I’m running out of adjectives. Boasting “clean” ingredients that are all locally sourced when possible, at $1.75-$2.75 a pop (depending on fanciness), they’re a welcome habit. “Wow,” one of my cohorts mouthed while stuffing her face. “This one is so big, it doesn’t even have a hole.” Amen, sister. -EL
Left: Whoo’s baker Anders Linquist; right: Ryan Lampro. 851 Cerrillos Road, Ste. B, 629-1678 Open daily 7 am-till they run out Whoo’s Donuts Few things can liven up a desolate newsroom quite like a box filled with donuts. Glazed, dusted and stuffed with creamy filling, they remind us crotchety journos of simpler times. Times that didn’t include deadlines, stretch-waisted pants or us having to worry about escalating blood sugar. Broaching the finish line for this guide, I decided to channel my munificent side and show up to HQ like a black-bearded Santa, my sleigh guided by the incomparable treats of Whoo’s. Needless to say they were a hit. I had to fend off a coworker with a letter opener for the dark chocolate crunch one. The red chile bacon one was solid, the orange cardamom heavenly, the cherry coconut one blissful, the blue corn blueberry lavender—help me out here, I’m running out of adjectives. Boasting “clean” ingredients that are all locally sourced when possible, at $1.75-$2.75 a pop (depending on fanciness), they’re a welcome habit. “Wow,” one of my cohorts mouthed while stuffing her face. “This one is so big, it doesn’t even have a hole.” Amen, sister. -EL

/end pic-cntxt

Whoo’s Donuts

Few things can liven up a desolate newsroom quite like a box filled with donuts. Glazed, dusted and stuffed with creamy filling, they remind us crotchety journos of simpler times. Times that didn’t include deadlines, stretch-waisted pants or us having to worry about escalating blood sugar. Broaching the finish line for this guide, I decided to channel my munificent side and show up to HQ like a black-bearded Santa, my sleigh guided by the incomparable treats of Whoo’s. Needless to say they were a hit. I had to fend off a coworker with a letter opener for the dark chocolate crunch one. The red chile bacon one was solid, the orange cardamom heavenly, the cherry coconut one blissful, the blue corn blueberry lavender—help me out here, I’m running out of adjectives. Boasting “clean” ingredients that are all locally sourced when possible, at $1.75-$2.75 a pop (depending on fanciness), they’re a welcome habit. “Wow,” one of my cohorts mouthed while stuffing her face. “This one is so big, it doesn’t even have a hole.” Amen, sister.

-EL

/end description